Stitching Spotlights 4.30.2010

This has been one hell of a week for me. Haven’t been feeling real well, hence the lack in posting and such. But I couldn’t just miss my weekly spotlights now could I? There is some great sewing going on around webland these days. I mean there usually is. You guys are seriously awesome.

This week’s spotlighted creation is from Karen at Did You Make That? A little green to go with your envy for some sewing inspiration. You know what’s crazy? I made this dress in green too, if you remember. Great pattern. Great fabric. Great fit. Karen, this is crazy fabulous! So glad you finally got to wear it too.

Have you seen these? They are to die for gorgeous and a perfect compliment to the warmer weather coming up. These flowers are like JCrew worthy if not better, don’t you think? Love love love them! I’m sure you will too! And they look seriously easy to make, not to mention so sophisticated and elegant.

Lastly, here’s a peek at my next sewing project. I’ve been contemplating a fitting shell for awhile now. Just to see what it’s like. I’m sure you’ll be hearing a lot about it. Crazy thing was, I was just about to buy the Vogue one and the pants too (which I still might) online and then I went thrifting and what did I find? Yeah, this perfectly intact pattern, uncut, complete instructions and only a whopping 50 cents. That’s right. Now that is what I call a bargain and in my size no less. What luck! And did I mention that there are 8 pages of instructions on fitting and alterations and such? This one is from 1985, however since it doesn’t look to have changed too much from the modern ones,  I think it will do the job just fine.

Happy Sewing Adventures and a well rested and invigorating weekend to you!

  • Belly - Love your links. I’ve also been sick this week, hope you feel better soon!
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  • Belly - And of course I forgot to say I also wanted to buy the Vogue fitting shell pattern. Now I think I’ll check ebay and etsy first.
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  • lsaspacey - I was thinking about getting that same Butterick fitting shell. It’s the same one shown in their current catalogs. I have the Simplicity of McCalls one but I love the fact that this one has a front zipper closing for easier access since you’ll be continually getting in and out of it.
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  • Emilie - Wow, Sunni, I learn so much every time I come here! Seriously, I didn’t even know what was a fitting shell… I’m so interested!That would be very helpful tool for me! Can’t wait to hear more about it here!
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  • karen - Oh my goodness! I am honoured. Thank you so much for this link and reference and for all your kind words. How amazing that we made the same dress in green. I love your version and I am in total awe at your sewing skills and ability to adapt a pattern.
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  • Tasia - Thanks for sharing! Karen’s green dress is gorgeous and so is yours. I really enjoy your Stitching Spotlights, I find so many exciting and inspiring new blogs to read this way! Hope you feel better soon, have a fantastic weekend!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - It’s totally worth it! I saw a few on ebay that would be perfect. Thank you for the get well wishes! You too!
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  • Abby - Oh my, I love the flower corsages! I will have to make some. I read the tutorial and they seem pretty easy!
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  • Abby - I’m sorry you’ve been sick! Are you feeling better now? It’s been a bad year for sickness!
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  • peter - I love that music! Who is it singing?
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Hi Peter!
    Its from an “Acoustic France” CD that I have. The group that sings the tune is “Les Escrocs” and the tune is called “Assedic.” It’s such a cool tune with an easy going yet frenchy sound. Glad you like it!
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  • Rose - Love this dress and the details! You have such a lovely way of presenting your projects.
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Stitching Spotlights 4.23.2010

This week I’ve gathered some inspiring sweetness from sewing peeps that have caught my eye. Keep all that great stuff coming, because I love getting excited about what to sew next.

This week’s weekly creation comes to you from Rachel. I’ve seen the polka dot madness going on all around and I’ve thought about wearing polka dots and have just never really tried. This Rooibos creation is the bee’s knees, and did you by chance notice how flat the fabulous little collar is laying? I’ve noticed that this has been a problem for several who have tried this pattern, we might just have to ask for a tutorial to let us in on that secret! Beautiful job Rachel!

Have you seen Esther’s blog/burdastyle creations? Yeah, I’m way jealous that she’s only 15 too!!!! Way way way jealous. Where was I when I was 15? Definitely not being cool or doing anything creative.  She’s got some serious photography talent. Not to mention all of her hand sewn creations are way out of this world.  And she has red hair. Now who doesn’t like a girl with red hair? Who?

Simplicity 2724 is getting some well deserved spotlight attention! Amelie (I know, can you even believe that this is her name, too sweet!) and Rifka from Burda Style have both made up their own superb creations. And threadsquare and Selfish Seamstress are pondering about making their own versions. I say, jump on the bandwagon folks, it’s a pretty ridiculously fabulous pattern. But then, I guess I’m a little biased.

Recently I made the rather expensive purchase of a pair of Gingher Pinking Shears. I don’t have a serger, and I actually don’t know many stitchers who do. If you’re hankering for a serger and just can’t afford it right now, pinking shears might be a good investment for the present. They work great, especially on cotton, and don’t leave behind the bulky seam allowance other seam finishing techniques might. For added fray-edge security, I give the seam allowance a simple straight stitch close to the pinked edge.

And that’s a wrap friends! Happy weekending!

  • Belly - That Esther is so creative! Is there anything she doesn’t do perfectly?
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  • peter - Re sergers, they are dangerous! They have HUGE appetites for fabric and can devour (and destroy) a sewing project if one isn’t careful.
    I may re-visit my pinking shears myself!
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  • amelie - Hey, that’s me in this post !! I’m flattered – but of course, you know this dress was only possible thanks to the naughty secretary dress ;o)
    If i tell you that my last name sounds very much like “Poulain” ( as in “the fabulous destiny of Amélie Poulain” – the film), does it make you smile ? And yes people in France get mixed up and i do get called AMélie Poulain once in a while ;o)
    Thanks for sahring Hester’s blog : really nice!!!
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  • Tasia - Thanks for sharing! I’m amazed with Esther’s self-timer photos, so talented. Love everyone’s version of the Simplicity dress, that’s a pattern you could make 10 times and have each one look different.
    Love your Stitching Spotlights posts, they get me pumped for sewing on the weekend! Have a good one!
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  • Stacyverb - What a great post full of inspiration for the weekend! And it’s so funny you should mention Red Headed Stranger, because my hubby just gifted me a new copy of it yesterday. One of my favorites!
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  • Rachel - Oh my gosh, I am a bright red with embarrassed happiness right now!! Thank you Sunni for making me feel so special!!
    I made a red and black rooibos, and will post a tutorial on my blog for making the collar lay flat. It is really simple.
    I am really interested in pinking shears. I’ve been zigzagging the edges, and it takes bloomin’ forever. I’ve seen them mentioned on a few other seamstress’ blogs — so you cut the fabric with the shears, run a straight stitch close to the edge, and then the seam is finished?
    Please tell me all you know!! I would love to not have to sit there zigzagging every seam!!
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  • Jana @ The Summer House - I love my pinking shears but I’m thinking they need sharpening….
    Jana
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - She is unbelievably creative. Love everything she does!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Peter I’m so glad you said this! This makes me rethink my interest in investing in one. Hmmmm….
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - I can’t believe this! I love Amelie, its my most favorite movie in the whole world. What a terrific name!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh we can not wait to see the red and black version! AHHHHH!! Very excited! Can’t wait for the tutorial either!
    As for the shears, yes. I actually cut my fabric with my regular shears first and then after sewing each seam, I trim the seam with the pinking shears and then give a straight stitch. I’m sure you can do it many different ways. Pinking shears are seriously worth the investment. I really didn’t believe they worked until I pre-washed a pinked cut of fabric. Not even half so much fray came out of the edge. Totally converted now.
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  • Uta - You’ve inspired me to pass on the “Premio Amigo Artesano” Award to you! Please visit my blog: http://el-little.blogspot.com/2010/04/award.html
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How to Avoid Sudden Curve Clipping Death

I’m a little nutty about good sewing techniques. When I find a really good one, I want to shout it from the rooftops and let everyone know that the secret to such and such is doing this. It’s very fortunate that I have you, dear readers, to tell all these things to as shouting on rooftops is a little looney. Let’s have a small trip down memory lane before I let you in on this HUGE secret.

I’m a mostly self-taught seamstress. My grandma and aunt sew and my mom would sew for herself and my sis and me here and  there as we were growing up. I took 2 sewing classes in high school and though I was interested in fashion and sewing, I left everything else behind as I went on to college to get a music degree. The year I completely finished my degree, my parents gave me a sewing machine for Christmas. Strangely I didn’t take the sewing machine out of its box for six months. After that, well, the rest is history. I’ve become completely obsessed. I love to sew. I really really do. Being self-taught, I rely on myself to a certain extent but also books. I recently purchased The Sewing Bible by Ruth Singer. The best part is that Ruth herself is a self taught seamstress too! That’s pretty cool I would say.

I was reading through a few things one day and stumbled on the correct way to clip curves. You know when a pattern tells you to clip the curves to allow the curved seam to lay flat and create a more natural line. Inevitably when I would do this, you could see exactly where I had clipped the dern curve. It was not pretty. It looks very unprofessional. Very. It looks especially bad on the jacket collar as seen in Exhibit A. Please note that the “indent” if you will, is right where I clipped the curve. So, what do you do?

Well instead of clipping head on into the curve, take one edge of the seam allowance and clip a slanted clip approximately every inch. Now take the opposite seam allowance and clip a slanted clip the opposite direction of the opposing seam allowance’s clips and in between the opposing seam allowances clips. And there you have it folks, avoiding sudden curve clipping death. You may now go forth with confidence that you will never again have curve clipping indents. Ruth Singer, you are a genius!

  • Isabel - Genius! I’ve been dithering on getting this book, but this seals it. Thank you.
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  • MaryEllen - This is an OMG idea. It makes perfect sense. I’ve sewn for 45 years. Something new to learn everyday.
    MaryEllen
    Windsor, CT
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  • karen - Thank you, Cupcake Goddess. So simple but one of those things that you can’t know until you know, if you get my drift. Thanks for sharing!
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  • davidikus - This is great. Another way of achieving the same result is to cut the fabric in the bias. Take a look at a tie: it is cut diagonally in a square of silk, because when the threads are in diagonal instead of being vertical or horizontal (“coupées dans le biais” / bias), the fabric will fold around neatly, with minimum creasing. You can get rid of many unwanted creases by shifting the angle of the woven threads in a fabric (not necessarily by 45 degrees). This is how the Haute Couture seamstresses obtains fabulous drapery effects. This is also why there is such a thing as bias cut ribbons, which are helpful at the back of button holes or for piping.
    http://davidikus.blogspot.com
    PS. Here is a definition that might be helpful:
    A true bias exists when the line is forty-five degrees in angle from the lower left-hand corner of the goods to the upper right-hand corner of the material. Undergarments are cut on the true bias to forestall sagging, rolling and twisting, and to afford better wear to the consumer. Binding cut on the true bias can be easily applied, particularly on edges which are curved.
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  • Tasia - Oh my god this is brilliant! Just when I think I know everything there is about sewing, I learn something new. I will definitely be using this technique from now on!
    Thanks so much for sharing your tips :)
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  • Abby - I thought this was going to be about clipping all the way through the seam. I’ve done that.
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  • Angela - Aha! I will try this one my next clipping. :) Thanks!
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  • nikole - I’ve never tried a slant slit before but I do stagger my clips when I do them. But will most definitely try this one out
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  • Jessica - I do this (read about it in an old 1940s sewing manual.) I hate to clip though – I have terminal fear of clipping too far, as I have done many times, and I clip the least amount possible to get whatever I’m making to work! I also use pinking shears sometimes (on finished seams only) to make the seam allowances invisible from the outside rather than grading (I hate grading!)
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - It really is a great book and has great perspective from a self taught seamstress. I really love that!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - This is simply fabulous! I love that you’ve been sewing for so long. And yet, it seems there are still more and more techniques and better ways to do things popping up all the time. I love that about sewing. This is getting me WAY excited.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh thank you so much for the tips and bias cut ideas. I’m definitely going to give this a try and see where I can incorporate this next.
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  • Jana @ The Summer House - So clever-this is a wonderful clipping tip! I’m bookmarking it!
    Jana
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  • makingtime - I’ve never seen that before – will try! I took one class in college and they taught to trim the seam allowance very small instead of clipping (trusting that the curve means there is change of grain direction, therefore will not ravel. I wouldn’t dare it on loosely woven fabrics, though; this staggered slant cut sounds much safer for that.
    Just found your blog through MPB and love it!
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  • sonja - Thank you for this! Most of my curves turn out less than perfect. Can’t wait to give this trick a try.
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  • Melissanne - HO! Thank you for the tip!!!
    I had no idea that’s what they meant by “clipping the curves”. Now I have no more excuses for not clipping!
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  • Madelaine - I tried this last night on a Sencha blouse, and it worked like a dream. Thanks so much for sharing!
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  • Tenshi - Genius! Thanks a lot lot lot for posting another great tip! I tried this out with my latest jacket and it works like a charm. It looks so neat and tidy, absolutely unbelievable.
    I also tried out the broad shoulder adjustment you posted about earlier, but haven’t yet set in the sleeves. I am very very excited about how it is going to fit, even though a stretchier fabric probably has never been used for a jacket, so the change might not be very noticeable.
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  • indigorchid - Oo, this looks like a great technique! It looks like it will prevent me from accidentily clipping too far too! Ok, off to sharpen my little snippy scissors!
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Giving Your Fabric a Bleached Makeover

When I began the search for the fabric for my Perfect Spring Dress, I received numerous comments and emails about how I should keep in true form of the dress by finding a border print fabric. I’ve looked. They are hard to come by.  I had an idea dawn on me after the fabric had been voted on and I decided to give it a try. I did try this on the original winning fabric with no result, because it was made of a colorfast polyester/cotton blend. And then unfortunately I ruined that version of the dress anyway. I had read about fading fabric with bleach over at Wisecraft awhile back and I thought I could, just possibly, achieve a faux border print look with a little help from a few cups of clorox and some water. This was an interesting experiment to say the least, but one that surprisingly worked, maybe not to achieve a border print but a different looking fabric. The method was easy enough. I wanted the bodice to be the most faded here. To do this, I cut the pattern pieces first and then bleached them. The same was done for the skirt except, I bleached the skirt in sections starting with the top section. I dipped the skirt into the bleach mix starting with the top and allowed it to sit for 1 minute before moving the skirt down 6 inches and then repeating this process until I got to the bottom. Then I soaked the pattern pieces in water and apple cider vinegar (a neutralizer) to stop the fading. I air-dried the pattern pieces before sewing them and well, there you have it. I’m fairly happy with the result, however I think I could have bleached a little bit longer just for a little more fading. And the tie is bleached too. What was once a rust orange is now more of a poppy red. What do you think? Have you tried this before? Have you ever thought about it?

How did I come up with what increments and how long to soak you may ask? I tested a scrap of fabric first to see how long it would take to get the desired effect. Only 5 minutes. I divided 5 by the inches of my skirt which was 29. Rounding off that number gave me 6. Yeah. I’m a mathematician and totally didn’t know it. Ha ha ha.

Same printed fabric for each dress

The way weird thing is that doing this to the fabric weakened the weave to a point where it’s more like an apparel fabric than a quilting weight cotton. You have to be pretty careful, I mean this does weaken the fibers and weave of any fabric. In that one post on quilty cottons Hillary pointed out that quilty cottons don’t wrinkle quite right for apparel. I agree. But I found that this bleaching thing really strips the fibers of the dye (that I think adds to that weird wrinkling) and weakens the fiber to a point where its more pliable as a garment fabric rather than quilting. You should try it and see what you think. Also, I think the faded coloring gives it a more vintage feel and surprisingly, a totally different look than the original fabric. What do you think?

Here’s a link to an article I read on Threads about this type of thing and then there’s Marta’s book which is about how to do this sort of thing in depth.

  • Erica B. - Oh I am loving both your dress and that shirt!
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  • Erica - Very interesting. The dress looks lovely bleached; it softens the look to make it light and airy. Good job with this; I may have to try this one day!
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  • Karin - It looks really great! Might be a way for me to use all those wild but wonderful prints (f.ex. old curtains) that make me feel invisible, they might work if they’re a bit more subdued.
    What kind of bleach did you use (ie, what’s the active component in it, we have different brands here and bleach is not so common at all)?
    Oh, and I LOOOOVE your banner…
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  • Ali - it totally gives it a different feel. how intriguing! i’ll definitely have to try it. thanks for the post!
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  • Tasia - What a good idea! I’m a huge fan of the border prints myself, but there are not enough options out there! I would have never thought of bleaching, thanks for the brilliant suggestion and showing us how it’s done.
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  • Angela - Ooo… that’s so cool. I want to give it try… thanks for the tips!
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  • Jana @ The Summer House - How resourceful-I’ve thought about it but never tried it :)
    Jana
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  • janey - I love the effect you have got bleaching the fabric, and as another commenter has said I might try it on some curtain fabric I have as it is far too stiff for clothes and the colours are are bit too defined. I’m not sure it would change enough for this kind of floaty dress but it certainly might for a skirt or maybe a bit more tailored frock!! It would need careful thinking about as I don’t want to look like my granny’s sofa walking the streets!!
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  • Abby - Yay! you did it! This turned out so beautiful! It looks great here and I think it would be a great tool to try on some other things too, like printed napkins!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh thank you! And I really do think this is a great way to tame those wild prints. I used Clorox brand bleach and here in the U.S. it’s located in the cleaning isle of the supermarket. Hopefully this helps.
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  • Adventures in Dressmaking - Wow, that is intense, way to go! I’m not sure I’m quite that brave… but the fabric is beautiful bleached!
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  • Karin - Thank you so much for your reply to my question! I’ve been busy as a bee (not sewing I’m afraid) and didn’t have the time to either answer or try it out, but I will keep this in memory and try it out later on!
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Perfect Spring Dress

This dress has morphed into a Frankenstein all its own. Started out with this inspiration, found this pattern, found these two fabrics – of which the winning version I ruined and the second version, well as you can see, does not look like quite like the inspiration though, for me it’s just the right fit. So, how did we get here? Let me preface all this by saying that I should have gone to the Anthropologie store and tried this dress on. That would have solved the issue of me sewing something that didn’t suit my silhouette. That being said, let’s start at the beginning.

The pattern didn’t fit the way I wanted it to. Not to mention, I was only pilfering the bodice and not the whole dress. After mocking up a muslin for the bodice, I noticed that the princess seams were all wrong for what I was going for. Moved the darts for that and then did my second muslin. Much better.

Cut it out of the winning sheet fabric. Ruined that by not making the skirt full enough. This looked seriously terrible. However, I will say that the bodice is completely salvedgable and I will probably be looking for a project to incorporate this into, very soon.

Then cut it out of the losing fabric, bleached it (more on this to come), sewed it, and was just about to hem it when after trying it on I found that I really didn’t like it. That full skirt looked so….princess-y. Even Mr. S commented that, “It’s just not the right look for you, is it?” I don’t know that I could tell you what I expected it to look like with that full skirt. I really don’t. But for my silhouette and mood, it was too silly for words. That’s when I knew I wouldn’t wear it and after all this work, I can’t just not wear it. Now that would be silly!

At this point I was about to shove the dumb thing into my favorite drawer of unfinished projects. And then I remembered my New Year’s Resolution. Had to finish it. It’s the principle of the thing. Had to. There you have it.

So here it is. And I sware, if you say one mean thing about it, I’ll burst into tears. Be a little tender as my poor fingers have been through the ringer with this one. For me, its a little anticlimatic. Hopefully not for you. Like it? (There is no other option for you but to say yes, so you’d better) I will say that I do like it. I love the tie. That’s the best part for me. I tried this dress with a number of different belts and nothing quite worked and then it dawned on me that I really needed that poppy color somewhere. I think that brings the whole dress together. What say you? Also, the bottom part might look a little familiar to those of you who have bought Simplicity 2724. Yeah, its the full skirt option. Did I mention that I love that pattern?

  • yahaira - I can’t believe you hate it! maybe you need to step away from it for a while?
    I LOVE it! so there
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  • Gertie - You poor dear! Well, I DO like it, and I think you look adorable in it, especially with that red bow. Even if it’s not your favorite dress, it will be so nice to throw on in the summer. Now tell us more about this bleaching . . .
    I’m in the middle of a similar tortured process, so I completely understand. This too shall pass, right?
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  • clare - I think it’s a winner! I love the fabric.
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  • karen - Wow, that’s a disaster? I hope I have lots and lots of disasters, just like yours. It’s lovely and the red ribbon belt is inspired.
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  • lsaspacey - I’m confused, did you change the skirt or is this what you are calling a too-full skirt? I can definitely see the inspiration dress as having a full skirt but this doesn’t look like a “Princess-y” full skirt to me. (Ask any 6-yr old girl) I think it looks great on you and is a great dress overall. Also when you said you ruined the other dress I thought you had really ruined it like burned it while ironing or cut into a seam or something. If that skirt wasn’t full enough perhaps it still can be saved. Maybe you just need to get used to a different shape on you because I swear this one looks great on you!
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  • Amy - I hate it when this happens. You work so hard and then it is just eh. That happened to me last year. It still looks great on the hanger but on me, oh brother! But you finished it! YAY!!! I think it looks very springy on you and I do love the ribbon sash, they are among my favorites! I agree with Yahaira, maybe step back for a bit, then wear it out and see how many compliments you get on it.
    And please tell us about the bleaching process.
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  • Elle - This looks GREAT on you!! Seriously! And the red tie really is perfect. I know what you mean about not liking something though, especially after all its incarnations. After it hangs around for awhile (and you read all these nice comments), maybe you’ll come around, too.
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  • Belly - I actually adore it. You’re right, the tie does tie it all together (hehe) and keeps it from looking washed out. I think it would be so much fun to wear in the summer with a nice pair of sandals. Also: your photos are great – did you take them or was it the Mister?
    -Chedva
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  • Stacyverb - Oh, I hate when a project has so much baggage that I can’t look at it objectively anymore, which sounds like what you’re going through with this one. But truly, this dress is soooo lovely and as always your photos are gorgeous. I agree that the red tie at the waist really makes it look like more of an outfit than just a dress. Love it!
    P.S. I’m just a recent new reader and commenter, but I gave your blog a shout-out on my blog the other day: http://stacyverb.typepad.com/stacyverb/2010/04/weekend-countdown-sewing-blogs-1.html
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  • SPECinMnYerTRUM - Jayne:
    I had such a great time. When can we do it again?
    Although you have reservations about the look, you still have the eye and personality to ‘make’ the dress. You wear the dress just as much as the dress wears you. The Sash does save the light hues of the print.
    Kul
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  • Tasia - Oh, it’s so pretty! If I didn’t know there was a sad story behind the dress, I couldn’t see anything wrong with it!
    LOVE the red ribbon, it keeps it from being too sweet and simple, and highlights your tiny waist. It really looks stunning on you and your photographs are gorgeous. Just give it a bit of space, and I’m sure you’ll love it all over again!
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  • Angela - The dress is perfect! I love the bleach effect and that tie makes it the perfect spring dress! Oh by the way, I did receive the Spring Egg kit. It’s adorable! I haven’t had a chance to make it, but hopefully soon. Thanks so much for sending it!!
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  • Stacy Marie - I think its really beautiful, I enjoy the scoop neckline very much!
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  • Jennifer - I am not just saying this! I love it! It turned out fabulous and just right for you!
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  • Kat - I don’t know why you hate it so much. It looks great on you! Maybe its cause you spent so much time on it and it was annoying you. Leave it for a few days then go back and wear it and I am sure you will love it!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Yes, I agree! It will pass! I think I’m due for some easy stitching.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh thank you! I think the process was more of a disaster than the dress actually turned out. I’m a little sick of thinking about it. Time to move on. Hip hip hooray for a new project.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Originally I had a gathered skirt on the bottom. Very big looking and perhaps it was just the gathers hitting right at the waist that made it look wrong. The last version has the full pleated skirt option from Simplicity 2724. It’s much slimmer at the waist with the fullness coming out toward the leg. A little more flattering for me. Thank you!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh thank you! I think the dress is growing on me. I don’t really hate it. It’s just that I’ve been working on it for so long that its been a little anticlimactic.
    The bleaching process will be my next post. It’s kind of cool I think.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - I think you’re right. Thank you!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Yes Mr. S was the infamous photographer this time and since it was warm and so nice we went outside. Thank you.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh thank you, thank you!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - I think you are right. In a few days everything will look so much better. Thank you!
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  • Emilie - Well, I think that’s certainly NOT a disaster! I swear I’m not saying this to please you… Perhaps when you look at your dress you can just see all the laborious process for now… but just wait a few days and you’ll see that it’s really pretty and really spring-like :)
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  • senaSews - This dress is really adorable. Sorry, for you that it was such a hard progress on getting there. But it was worth it, it looks absolutely gorgeous!
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