Still working on my boyfriend’s jacket, but decided to finish a project I started a few weeks ago. I found myself being more and more drawn to making a skirt that didn’t require alot of fitting and was easy to wear. Not to mention with cold weather just around the corner, I was ready for something warm and Fall looking. And plaid. Mustard-y plaid. I’ve had this fabric stashed away since last year when I bought it intending to make….oh yeah, I can’t even remember now. 2 yards at $36 per yard = a very expensive circle skirt. I didn’t want to do anything cheap on this skirt either. So I lined the thing in bright banana yellow silk charmeuse too.  That only took $60. So let’s see, just for the fabric here, I’ve already spent $132. And if you haven’t fainted yet Mr. S, you’re on cue now. Oh dear! Needless to say, this thing is simply gorgeous. And by darn, if you don’t agree…..I’m not quite sure what I’ll do but it will be something.

It’s only fitting that I bring you this gorgeous creation after a little draught of sorts here in cupcake goddess land. I haven’t made a single garment since August. So it is with giddy excitement and pleasure I present, The Linda-Hop Skirt. Made from the Linda pattern on Burda Style no less. Easy peasy pattern with loads of potential for fun details. Since this was such an easy pattern, I decided to tackle this plaid double faced wool. It was simply dreamy to work with. And this stuff is extra thick and extra beautiful. And I matched up the plaids rather well I think considering this is my first time working with plaids. The plaid at the zipper just wouldn’t work for some reason, but its only off a slight bit in that one area, so there. I’ll live, I guess. Sigh….

The skirt went together quite smoothly. Easy fit, easy sew. I let the thing hang for about 3 weeks. And surprisingly, I didn’t know that you had to let circle skirts hang. Thank goodness I did an update on my facebook page and thank goodness there were some great stitcher’s watching over me giving me a few words of sound advice. So, if you didn’t know, it’s official, you have to let a circle skirt hang, at least overnight, before hemming it. This is perfectly sensible, because the seamed sides (my front and back here) are cut on the bias. Now, I don’t think I needed to let it hang for three weeks, originally I was planning to hang it for one, but then I decided that I wanted a vintage pin hem marker and it didn’t come for awhile. And I let it hang for that long because this fabric was not only thick, but rather tightly woven. It needed a real good stretch. So it got one.

I hemmed up the hem with horsehair braid. I follow Gertie’s advice and tutorial for this as she is an expert circle skirt maker. I didn’t have access to the type of horsehair braid that she uses. Mine was not as wide and I had to run a gathering stich along one edge. I just bought mine at Hancock’s. I love the finished product though. Oh my goodness! The hem looks so professional. And it gives the hem weight. I love it!

I gave it a lapped handpicked zipper with a vintage metal zipper. Could not be happier with the metal zipper. The skirt lining is finished with my favorite detail, lace. You might also be wondering why I’m wearing it with the seam in the front and back, as traditionally the pattern says it should be worn on the side. I had been looking at alot of mags for the inspiration for this skirt. The ones I liked best were plaid and had the plaids matched up perfectly and to show that off the seam was in the front. I loved this. Yeah. I can match my plaids. Thanks.

Other items of note:
Top – Just a sweater from Sear’s
Belt – Thrifted
Hose – Sear’s (yeah, they have really good tights this year. Just bought another pair that’s in houndstooth. And don’t forget to read my post on proper stocking care. If you want them to last, you have to put them in the freezer. HAVE. TO.)
Shoes – Crown Vintage

What do you think? Ever stitched a circle skirt? You probably should now, if you haven’t. I mean these things are the best things since….A-line skirts. Not only that, but you can twirl. And who doesn’t want a skirt that does that?

  • Patty - Yay! I have a circle skirt (well, dress) hanging right now! I also have a couple yards of purple/black/grey plaid flannel that I was considering for a full circle skirt as well – I love the lines on yours and am feeling the plaid even more!
    I like the seam on the center front for these kinds of skirts. It gives it a bit of interest and for some reason, my skirts lie/drape better when I wear the seams on the front/back rather than the sides. I think it has something to do with how I graded my circle skirt pattern up!
    Is there anything better than all the weight of the skirt, with the braid and then the lovely lining and lace? Yours is wonderful!
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  • Jennifer - LOVE LOVE LOVE! This is inspiring me to get up and sew one! I have a wool from Jo-ann’s that I would like to make one out of, but I don’t have enough yardage. I think I will have to go buy some more and recreate your look. However, I have never heard of this horsehair braid thing and must look it up!
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  • K-Line - OMG – I UTTERLY love this. I’ve been looking to make a skirt like this for a long while. If only Burda patterns weren’t so onerous with the pasting together of the pages…
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  • Uta - Gorgeous! I think you won’t regret the expense in the long run. I wear nothing as much as my wool skirts in the winter, the cost-per-wear is negligible!
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  • Peter - Gorgeous skirt. Great job!
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  • Maggie - That looks fantastic! I will have to put that pattern in my ever-growing lineup :)
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  • Sewing Princess - It’s really beautiful. I have never made a circle skirt as I feel it wouldn’t suit me…and would add too much bulk. Seeing it on you made me think. I love the details and the yellow hints
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  • Kristin P. - That skirt is so wonderful! I fell in love with it RIGHT AWAY! So, tights in the freezer? Hmmm, I guess I’ll have to do that.
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  • Laura - Fantastic! I especially love the lining being so cheerful. Here’s to sunny days in winter!
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  • Jane - It’s absolutely beautiful.
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  • Gertie - I’m in love! Great length, and I love the fabric and lining. And it’s beautifully made! Go you!
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  • petite josette - Your skirt is gorgeous, and I love the lining with the lace. I love the length of it too, it’s the perfect length for winter. I’ve been meaning to make a couple circle skirts like that, but haven’t found the right fabric yet.
    Congratulations again, and you were right to splurge on nice fabric, doesn’t it feel like it could be right out of an Anthropology store – except you made it !
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  • Tasia - Oooh it’s lovely! What a wonderful fall skirt. I absolutely love the bright yellow lining with the lace trim! This is a fantastic, keep-forever wardrobe piece. Stunning!
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  • liz - I love it! I have the linda skirt in my favs, but its so hard to tell what it looks like with the dark color burda makes it in. I’m going to have to make one myself soon, yours is such great inspiration. :)
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  • Shannon - I love a luscious plaid skirt and yours is just scrumptious!
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  • Alexandra - Now THAT’s a skirt.
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  • TanitIsis - So lovely. I will make myself a (regular wear) circle skirt one of these days, /sigh (so it can go and hang unworn like the rest of my skirts, I fear…)
    From my dance-circle-skirt days, hanging for weeks to months was often recommended, or soaking the skirt and hanging it to dry to speed up the process. Mind you, those were floor-length chiffon skirts from a minimum of 1.5 circles… there was a lot to hang out :)
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  • A Sewn Wardrobe - This is SO beautiful. I simply adore the fabric. You’re inspiring me to make a circle skirt soon!
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  • Kat - Wow, that is a fantastic skirt. The lining is super cute. I’m sure you’ll get a lot of wear out of it. It might just be cheaper in the long run that your other clothes. Love your blog.
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  • Alessa - I love the chevron your front seam creates. Also, I dig the bright, lacy underskirt. And the shoes…! My first sewing project, ever, was a circle skirt… though executed not half as professionally as yours, of course…
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  • Corinne - One of the nicest I hace seen,looks absolutely great on you!
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  • Kara - Beautiful! I like that you put the seam in the front to show off the matched plaids. It creates such a cool detail. And I love the punny name you gave it. 😀
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  • Kris - Such a stunning skirt! I love the attention to detail. :)
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  • Ruby Slippers - beautiful, little bit retro I really love circle skirts in heavier fabric, so nice to still look girly even when it’s freezing outside. I really like seeing what you have come up with, your not afraid to use a bit of colour or a print and having recently dyed my hair red I look to your colour choices often for ideas and inspiration :-)
    x Ruby Slippers
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  • lakaribane - I love circle skirts but I’ve never used horsehair. Bias tape, on the other hand…But I do understand the weight angle.
    And I went further in my bias myself. Made my aunt a lined, white on white windowpane pattern long circle skirt last summer and I used these tablecloth weights to speed up the process. I hear you can also do that by ironing in the direction of the bias(?) but my energy issues are, sadly, unresolved so I try to do things low tech.
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  • jayne - Ok Ok I promised myself I’d finish the pencil skirt first 😉 This circle skirt is wonderful to look at. I found them especially fun during the winter-trudging through snow, fun to wear with boots, easy to move in…I really like your extras ☞ the lace edged silk slip with horsehair braid ! never heard of it but that’s why I read your blog. What better way to treat myself? Fun sewing with new ideas and fun to wear….ok ok I’ll finish the pencil skirt…:D
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  • Angela - It’s beautiful!! I love how you have it styled, too!!
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  • Christine - Gorgeous!!! And I love the plaid color. I’m obsessed with plaid so I’m pretty jealous about this creation. Looks great!
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  • tokie - Love this.
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  • Eilane - Linda saia, absolutamente vale o investimento.
    Abraços
    Eilane – Brasil
    Beautiful skirt, absolutely worth the investment.
    Hugs
    Eilane – Brazil
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  • Amanda S. - (I missed this post somehow.) It’s a super pretty skirt! Love the fabrics!
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  • juebejue - thanks for the inspiration! i just bought some fabric and am gonna make one for myself this week!
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  • denise calhoun - Gorgeous. The plaids match and everything. I am in awe!
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  • Mezzocouture.wordpress.com - Now THIS is a beautiful skirt. Love the plaid. Love the circle. LOVE the lining and lace! Beautiful. Just beautiful!
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Well, you’d better run right over to Patty, The Snug Bug’s blog and enter to win one, because she’s giving away one of my colorful little Tailor’s Hams. It’s the first time this has ever happened, at least with hams anyway. It’s rather monumental if you ask me. And don’t forget to check out the interview she held with me about my shop. I haven’t really talked about the shop much, but I finally got a chance to. Gush.

Thanks Patty! Happy Halloween to everyone! Hip Hip Hooray! Now go and fight to win your HAM!

  • Erika - I love my ham! but i’m an idiot and didn’t buy the matching seam roll when I had the chance!
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  • Kara - I love my ham, too! And my seam roll. Any plans to make ham/seam roll sets with coordinating pin cushions? I’d love to get a set for my mom for Christmas!
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  • Amanda - The ham and seam roll are so cute! Do you sell them individually too? I would’ve loved to have purchased a set, but I already have a boring ol’ ham. Your idea of having a shop of handmade sewing notions is fantastic! Looking forward to your future creations.
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  • Karen in VA - I agree with Kara, the 3 piece coordinating set would be awesome!! I’d buy it in a heartbeat for myself, esp. if the set were purple….love your blog and your shop…go for your dream!!!
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Oh the things we do for….fitting! Right? Well after I graded up this delightful jacket, I had to at least make one muslin to test the fit, and make sure that everything lined up just right. Hip hip hooray, it did for the most part. The front piece needed to be a little longer and other than that, I made a pretty good grade for this pattern. Shocking, yes! because this is only the second time I’ve done this and because it was a jacket.

The muslin fit quite well actually. It felt just a little baggy in the bodice, so I trimmed 1/2″ off the sides. Suprisingly, I had to make the sway back adjustment on this jacket as the waistband was a bit droopy. Not an adjustment I usually do, but hey, will be watching for that more now. I also needed a little more in the shoulder area. Yup, even with that pleat in the back, still not enough room in the yoke! Linebacker shoulders, I tell ya. Other than that, feeling pretty good about the overall fit and look of this pattern. I thought the collar would be a bit overwhelming, but I like it. It goes well with the puffy sleeve.

I’ve also decided to leave out the flap pocket. Sometimes, for me, things like that are just silly. But I might add one of those back belt-ish things with the two buttons on each side. Can’t remember what their called. And pockets like the ones on my mom’s jacket to boot. I think I’m more excited about the details of the jacket than the actual jacket itself. OK, back to my sewing machine. More to show next week, maybe even finished!

If you have an eye out for a jacket or coat, this book will give you step by steps on the fitting issues for jackets. Really this book, you cannot live without.

  • Laura - Wow, the collar and puffed sleeve combination is looking really fresh and modern to me! I went from digging on the 70’s kitsch of my childhood, to seriously dreaming of making something similar in corduroy maybe. Your muslin looks fab, and I think your choice on the flap pocket is a sound one. Especially working with a napped fabric you can really run the risk of it looking overworked no matter how much care you take.
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  • Peter - I think this looks great, Sunni. Can’t wait to see the finished jacket!
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  • Laura - Such was my frenzy that I found this pattern on ebid, and I’m going to just pretend this is a Boyfriend’s Jacket sew-along if you don’t mind. The grading post is also going to come in SO handy as well. I hope you don’t mind me jumping your train! Thanks so much for the inspiration..
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  • Tasia - Cute! I like the pleat along centre back, how it opens above and below the waist. What a fun project!
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  • B @ Sweet Limes - Seeing this it makes me want to see if I can find this pattern too, but unlike Laura I haven’t had the same luck to find one. :( I think it’s going to turn out to be drool worthy though.
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  • Eilane - Hello Sunni, the muslin was very good, amazing how a model can be as current vintage and beautiful.
    Hugs
    Eilan – Brazil
    http://www.eilanevidacostura.blogspot.com
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  • Uta - This will be so cute, Sunni! I have to fight the urge to throw out the already cut out short jacket I’m making and start over on a boyfriend jacket…
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  • Liz - This is such a cute pattern. I like it better on you than the pattern picture. Can’t wait for a potential sway-back adjustment post… :)
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  • Jill - I love the puff in the sleeves. Just call me Anne Shirley.
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  • juebejue - aww, i love the back! i think i will love itmore once you are done with the adjustments!
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  • Wanett - How could you know that I needed EXACTLY that book! I am trying to use a Burda Mag coat pattern and you know that’s like flying blind. Thanks!
    And your jacket looks awesome so far, too! ;O)
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  • Tamsin - Hi, This looks great. I am sewing a muslin for a dress (I have never done this before). I think that I need to take in the side seam under the arm – should I do this before I set in the sleeve or after – to see how the sleeve sits as is?
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  • Sherry - Oooh this looks lovely! The sleeves and collar really go together – can’t wait to see your finished one!
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  • Faye Lewis - Thank goodness I have the book, and I treasure it because it was gifted to me! It’s helped me a lot with my Lady Grey project. I love the fit of your jacket and the fact that you are really good at grading. I will refer back to your post for future projects. I love the pattern and I use to have a suit so similar to it in baby blue and it was gorgeous.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Hi Tamsin,
    I made the alteration to the tissue first and then cut out my pattern pieces. Heres the problem: If you take in the sides its going to affect the ease on the sleeve. So youll need to take in the sleeve the same amount you did for the sides and blend the edges into the sleeve seam. Does that make sense?
    If youve already stitched up both the bodice of the jacket and the sleeve and havent yet set in the sleeve, I would adjust the sides of the jacket and then set the sleeve in. You might have to take in the sleeve just a bit though too.
    Hopefully this helps. Let me know if I can help further.
    xoxo,
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  • Tamsin - Hi thanks – I’ll try the second one and see how that goes!
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  • denise calhoun - I’ve often looked at that pattern and wondered how it would make up. It’s gonna be gorgeous!
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  • Bunny - I actually like the way the back waist belt curves. I would just adjust the peplum so the two diagonal folds disappear, probably just a matter of lifting the peplum at CB. Great design.
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  • Angela - What a fun jacket! it looks great so far!
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My boyfriend jacket is a vintage 70’s pattern and came one size too small for me. I could make the case that I could just go online and try to purchase one in my size, however, when you have patterns given to you like I did, for free, no strings attached its hard to justify getting the same pattern in a different size and paying money for it. Wouldn’t you agree? I know. And what could be more fun that grading a pattern? I know, not that much. Maybe a giant root canal.

As I’m typing this, I’m currently grading Simplicity 5250. Can you believe that I’m nuts enough to actually grade the jacket here and not the pants? Me neither. But I am. I thought that it would be a good chance to practice grading. I needed just one size bigger. This is a 32 1/2 inch bust and I needed a 34 1/2 (or 35, but I went with 34 1/2 to make it easier) inch. So I thought I would do a post on grading. I’ve found this article on Threads to be most helpful and it goes into great detail about how to grade. I’m just filling you in on my experience.

Here I’ve done something that you probably shouldn’t do but I did anyway. Alter the original pattern. If this had been an older pattern, predating the 70’s and not a jacket with so many pieces I would have considered tracing the pattern and then using that to alter with. But I’m sticking to my guns on this one. I altered the original pattern, so there. You may not want to do this. That’s up to you. And don’t let anyone tell you different. It’s your pattern.

Onto the grade. I started with the back lining piece as it most closely resembles one of the 5 main slopers on the chart from the Thread’s article. I drew the lines in (accented here in red) and then figured the amount I needed to grade each line. The Thread’s article will help you with that too. The graph in the article goes up to two inches, however, if you need to do a bigger grade, multiply the graph. I did a two inch grade here. But if I were to do a four inch grade, I would take the numbers given in the graph for a two inch grade and double them. Make sense?

To get a good and even grade, I drew the grading lines in the same places of origin. For example, the horizontal grade line in the middle of the armscye should match the grade line of the sleeve head and the front lining piece. You with me? Good. I did this part by laying the pattern pieces over each other, matching them all up. For example, as I graded my back lining piece, I also put the lines in for the yoke, the back pleated section, the belt, the peplum, the collar and the sleeve. All the pattern pieces must grade at the same points for the grade to work. In other words, you can’t just pick random lines for grading, I’ve done that one before and its a real pain to figure out where you went wrong. Everything gets all wonky. Have the grade lines all originate from the same points.

Next I spliced and separated the pattern pieces one at a time. Added in the tissue and used my ruler to determine the amount of extra tissue I needed. If you are grading down, you obviously won’t need the tissue. You’ll be overlapping the pattern pieces instead. In the end, my piece looked graded, ha ha ha (A for effort, right?). Where needed, I neatened or blended the edges of the grading areas with my straight ruler or french curve. After that I went through all the pieces and matched them up again, laid them over each other, etc and made sure that the notches matched each other (otherwise, I remarked them) and that there wasn’t a piece longer or shorter than each other. I find it easier to sew the garment if the notches and seams all match up. Who doesn’t, right? Ha.

A few things to keep in mind. When grading a top or a dress, stick with your bust measurement. With bottoms, stick with your waist or hip measurement depending on which is bigger or harder to fit. Once you are finished grading a pattern, its a good idea to make a muslin, just to make sure that the grading worked and you don’t have one piece longer or shorter than the other or something somewhere doesn’t quite match up. That’s up next, for me. Also, I wouldn’t bother grading a pattern if you’re only 1 to 1 1/2 inches off from the pattern. Instead I would make a muslin and fit from there. If you are 2 or more inches off, you’ll need to grade.

Hopefully this makes sense. How do you normally grade a pattern? Any tips or tricks you’ve come by that helps?

  • Tasia - Nice work! It looks easy once it’s all graded and finished doesn’t it? What a cute jacket pattern!
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  • zoe - Thanks for sharing this and I wish you all the best with your project. The pattern is gorgeous, I’m sure you’ll make an awesome job. I’ll looking forward to following your next steps…
    xxx
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  • Ashley - Thanks for the great post! My next project is a vintage pattern that I have to grade. It will be my first time grading so I’m a bit nervous about it, but I guess that’s what muslins are for. :)
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  • Liz - My mom, who sewed all the time in the 60’s etc. told me I just need to add more fabric to the side seams to make it larger/smaller. I wasn’t sure if I agreed with her statment. Do you know the pros/cons with adding to the side seams to make a garment larger vs. grading?
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  • Jill - Thank you SO much for this tutorial and the links. I just bought a vintage pattern on line that I’m in love with, but it’s a bit small. I figured I either need to lose fifteen pounds or learn how to grade. The former might be the best idea, but I think the latter is more likely given the fast approach of baggy sweater weather!
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  • Sheri - OMG! I made this jacket in 1974! I made it in mauve pinwale cordoroy. I used vintage gold buttons and made bound buttonholes. I loved that jacket! I made it again for a friend at my sister’s office. I still have this pattern, also a size 10, somewhere in storage. Thanks for bringing back fond memories.
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  • nicole - Great post, cant wait to see the complete project. Pattern grading can be quite daunting so it’s great to have it explained so well :-)
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  • Ana - Thanks for this (and the Threads link). I have several patterns that I love but no longer fit so I shall definitely be giving grading a go.
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  • Eco Chic - Thank u very much for sharing this and I wish you great success with your project…. The pattern is gorgeous, I’m sure you’ll make an awesome job. I’ll looking forward to following your upcoming steps…http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Th7hEvqX7CU Very Usefull!!!!
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Hi Liz,
    You bring up a very good point and one that when I did my first grading project I thought would be fine. OK here’s the problem with just adding or decreasing inches to the side seam. The side seam can be let in or out depending on if the garment is too big in the bodice, but let’s think about what this affects. If you localize the grade to this area you’re only going to have more or less room to move your arm around in and more or less room in the bodice. The underarm will be thrown terribly off if you decide you need a 4 inch grade and only grade the side seams. And what about the sleeve? It will probably be too small for the armhole at that point. Also, what about the bust, shoulder and shoulder blades? Adding or subtracting inches to the side seam won’t do anything for those areas. Does this make sense? Especially if you’re doing a really big grade, you won’t want to add inches just to the side seam, you’ll want the piece to grade in all places. Think about when you buy a multisized pattern. If you notice, the pattern pieces tend to get larger or smaller in the same areas. That’s what I’m trying to do here. Hopefully this makes some sense and gives you a better idea of why its important to grade in all areas and not just one. Thanks for a really great question!
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You’ve probably been wondering if I will ever sew a garment again. I haven’t come out with a garment since….ahem, I can’t even remember. I’ve actually been working on several garments and just haven’t finished them or had time to go and grab the necessary finishing detail and such. I know. Lazy. That rotten little four letter word.

Well, in an effort to actually finish something, I hereby declare that I’m officially working on a boyfriend’s jacket. I’ve been following along with Gertie’s Lady Grey Sew-A-Long and though I’m not making that coat (as I’ve already made it, and am not quite ready to make it again), I am following her tailoring technique tutorials. Even bought that book about tailoring that she mentioned. Very very worthy investment, if I do say so myself.

So you might be wondering exactly what a boyfriend’s jacket is. I’ve wanted a new one for awhile. My mom had the sweet velveteen number above that I wore all through high school and my first years in college. I loved that jacket. A real genuine 70’s boyfriend jacket. My mom told me that my dad actually bought it for her when they were still….boyfriend and girlfriend. So it’s the real deal. And unfortunately it doesn’t fit. It never did fit real well, what with those football shoulders I’ve got. Could never bring my darn arms foward. Bowling was definitely out of the question. But back to my original point. A boyfriend’s jacket is a jacket made for a woman that looks like a men’s jacket. It’s supposed to give you that look of actually looking like a boyfriend’s jacket, like you know, your boyfriend gave to you. That sort of ring around the neck thing and all.

A couple of weeks ago, this lady at work brought me a box of patterns she didn’t want anymore. (PS, it’s a very good idea to tell older women you work with that you sew and that you love vintage patterns, because they will bring your their old patterns and let you have them. This is my 4th box!) I was sorting through them rather quickly, having a glance and what to my wondering eyes – Simplicity 5250. A rather feminine detailed boyfriend’s jacket. Loved. It. Had to have it. I dropped everything and ran, not walked, home. I had the navy velveteen and the blue polka dot silk lining at the ready for this very occasion. Hip Hip Hooray! I’m such a lucky girl. You have no idea.

Needless to say, I’ve made a good start on the jacket. And I will finish it, don’t you worry. It will be tailored, am waiting on hair canvas to arrive as I type. Had to grade the pattern up one size. Will show you more on that later this week. Made the muslin, and had slight but easily fixed fitting problems. And there you have it.

And you do realize what this means, right? Pretty much, I have nothing to go with this jacket. Ha ha ha. And I’ve commited myself not to make onesies anymore, so I’ll just have to base an entire outfit around this jacket. Oh what fun! Yay!

Thoughts anyone? Did you ever have a boyfriend’s jacket? I want to know, really I do. And I want to know what boyfriend gave it to you.

PS ~ You guys, seriously, are THE BEST! Thank you so much for guiding me in the right direction for a beggining knitter. I’m very excited to get started. Have bought two books, just need to pick a project and get some needles, yarn and other odd supplies. Couldn’t be happier with all of your fabulous advice! THANK YOU! You really know how to reach out and make a girl feel welcome!

  • Tasia - Ooh this project is going to be fabulous! When I wore boyfriends’ jackets they were usually cotton hoodies, not quite as cool as your mother’s boyfriend’s jacket! Love the fabric and lining combo, look forward to seeing it come together!
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  • Carlotta - Ooooh… are you sure it wouldn’t at the very list match with you Bella pants (my favorite hand-sewn pece of clothing of yours)?
    I just purchased a Betsy Johnson for Buttreick pattern that looks roughly the same as your jacket : big collar, even if it’s a shawl collar, same length and puffy sleeves, and I’d love to see what you’ll do with this pattern!!
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  • Carlotta - Oops, I meant “at the very least”, sorry about that!
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  • Laura - I was thinking Sunni’s pattern was totally Betsey Johnson too!
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  • Jill - Love it! The great thing about a boyfriend jacket is that you can wear it with anything — isn’t it supposed to look like your gentlemanly boyfriend threw it over your shoulders on a brisk fall day?
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  • Laura - I didn’t have a “Boyfriend Jacket” per se, but I did start buying vintage men’s tailored jackets at thrift stores as soon as I realized having all those pockets inside would let me carry everything without a purse!
    I love the look of your pattern, and think it would be adorable with your self-stitched jeans and with maybe either your ice cream top or the bosenberry blouse to tie in the great polka-dotted lining.. Of course, a pea green twill a-line skirt would be adorable paired with that bright navy as well. Come to think of it, pairing it with the “Summer in Italy” skirt might work too, especially with a magenta or purple top..See? Because you’re drawn to colors and silhouettes that you love, they inevitably go with other items in your wardrobe, and might not be the onesies you think they are…
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  • Seemane (aka Claire) - Back in the mid-90’s a bought loads of second-hand men’s suit jackets from charity-shops for like £2 / £3 each. They were all worn slouchy style with the sleeves rolled-up LOL!
    Re: your not wanting this to be a “onesie” – I agree with the above this will so look lovely with your Bella trousers. Also, how about a more casual style pencil skirt (we know you know how to make those 😉 ). Or… the Colette Beignet skirt in the same fabric + some contrasting buttons maybe? I can also see you wearing the jacket with a lovely 3/4 sleeve bow/tie-neck blouse in white swiss dot-cotton!!
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  • Alexandra Mason - I love the look of that Simplicity jacket and your material is so gorgeous! I have a boyfriend jacket from the carboot not from my man because he is about 2 times wider than me :)
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  • A Sewn Wardrobe - You could so wear this jacket w/ jeans and a simple T! I cannot wait to see the finished version (and any tutorials in between!!).
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  • Wanett - Oooooooh! I love velvet blazers! I had one once from Old Navy….I have no clue what happened to it. Around junior high school age, my aunt took me and my cousin to a used clothing warehouse in Brooklyn. There I bought this huge (I was about 90 lbs soaking wet then) suit jacket that I wore with the sleeves rolled up for years. I wish I could find pictures wearing it. I’m sure I looked a sight, lol! Though, I’m thinking I should go see about getting one now.
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  • lsaspacey - You must make the pants too, what a great shape. Of course, they don’t have to be in the navy cord but how about a coordinating herringbone or nubby flecked wool that picks up some other colors too? I’ve been in love with that pattern too but I think I’m too lazy now to make a fitted jacket. Can’t wait to see yours finished!
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  • Mrs. Lyons - Can’t wait to see the jacket! I love blazers, and that pattern you’re using is super cute!! I’ve got line-backer shoulders too, stuck on a small person’s body, lol!
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  • Angela - Ooo… I love the pattern!! Hehe.. can’t wait to see your progress on the boyfriend jacket!!
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  • Emily - Delicious fabric choices! Can’t wait to see it and the outfits you create with it.
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  • Becky - I’m a sucker for a good jacket–a love affair that also started in my teens, thanks to a couple of vintage-looking blazers I found in my very first shopping trip to Goodwill in jr. high and a couple of my mom’s 70s hand-me-downs. She had this one jacket that I absolutely loved. It looked kind of like a tweed, in a brownish-tannish shade with random bits of orange and turquoise, of all things, mixed in. And it definitely had a bit of a menswear look to it, though I know it wasn’t a genuine boyfriend jacket because my mom actually sewed it when she was a teenager. That was such a great jacket–the only reason I eventually gave it up was because I’m a bit taller, and definitely broader in the shoulders, than my mom. And so it was always a little too tight across the back. Not to mention the sleeves were too short for my monkey arms. Oh, and it was some kind of wool or wool blend, which I’m highly sensitive to and can’t really wear without breaking out. But part of me wishes I’d kept it anyway, because I’ve never found a lighter brown jacket that was quite that awesome since.
    Your pattern looks really great–looking forward to seeing the finished product! (And I’m laughing because Gertie’s tailoring series is inspiring me too– I don’t need a new outerwear coat, but I do have plans for a corduroy jacket later this fall and just might use her series as reference. Because I’m always up for learning a new technique, and who says corduroy can’t be tailored?)
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  • Julie - I smiled when I read about letting the older women you work with know that you sew. I just gave away a lot of 70’s patterns that are too small for me. After looking at your article and the article in Threads maybe I should have kept them and graded them up! This boyfriend jacket is cute. I hate the boxy crap that all you can find now. I’ve started working with repro Victorian patterns to get away from that.ReplyCancel