Pencil Skirt Love

A smattering of different ideas to fuss up a pencil along the top row of images

I decided to tackle a couple of pencil skirts for Self Stitched September. I had purchased the Jenny pattern from Burda Style awhile back and thought it was time to stitch it up. I just got rid of two ready-to-wear pencil skirts, boring black and brown ones, that had definitely seen better days. I’m always amazed at some of the things that I’ve chosen to buy over the years and how poor quality they really are. The brown skirt had this awful polyester nylon lining that clung to anything and everything. And the black one was completely unlined, made from some awful polyester junk. Both had side zips, both dug into my waist, and both were too baggy in the hips. Do you have that problem? I simply can’t STAND it. By the end of the day, I want to cut myself out of the thing. Uggghh….

I’m in love with the pencil skirt in the middle, that olive color is to die for and it looks beautifully fit

Well, onto more pleasant things. I needed some inspiration. Nothing like flying by the seat of your pants without a road map. I keep a creative inspiration journal with me and when I find clippings of things I like I cut them out and paste them in it. Surprisingly, I have a thing for pencil skirts. I find the silhouette they create rather clean, sexy and up town. And they are so feminine. They bring out all those curves. Bring out the firetrucks!

The two bottom images are fabulous, a mini pencil skirt and that gorgeous blue traditional pencil skirt

Tried making a pencil skirt lately? I’m also in love with the fact that something so sleek and sexy comes from 1 – 1.5 yards of fabric. That’s definitely something to write home about. Not to mention, you get to line it (or not, depending on your preference) in something you want to line it in, like silk. Or maybe even that bemberg rayon lining. Oh, the lush!

The image in the middle is a great idea, adding a border along the bottom to spice it up and bring it out of the ordinary

Just a little pencil skirt love for your Thursday morning perusal.

  • Belly - There’s nothing like a good pencil skirt, and nothing as annoying as an itchy pencil skirt (in fact, I’m all itchy right now, just from the thought!). I love the images you collected, especially the charteuse-mustardy one and the blue skirt, next to the mini. Can’t wait to see what you come up with!
    ReplyCancel

  • Suzie - Oh I LOVE pencil skirts, they are just so flattering! And I’ve just bought a tonne of fabric that I plan to make into numerous pencil skirts so you’re post came at the perfect time. Love all those inspirational images, especially the bold colours. Loving the bright blue and also the red one at the top of the first page.
    I’m also trying to think of a suitable blouse/top to make out of a pink linen that would sit nicely tucked into these numerous skirts I plan to make…but no inspiration coming to me yet…..
    Really looking forward to seeing how your skirt turns out :)
    ReplyCancel

  • Darci - I see about four or five pencil skirts in my future for fall… also, just read something last night about the need for underlining pencil skirt so that the backside doesn’t bag out over time. I’m planning on using silk organza for that.
    Gorgeous!
    ReplyCancel

  • Emilie - I also love pencil skirts. I want to sew me one for a very long time. Result, no pencil skirt to date… maybe seeing yours will motivate me :) I can’t wait to see it, I’m sure it will be amazing as usual… The yellow skirt and the olive one are my favorites!
    ReplyCancel

  • Becky - I love the look of that yellow polka-dot one! Alas, my hips would probably love the look of that green vertically-striped one much, much better.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh yes! Pink linen top would look beautiful in a top, all billowy and sweet over a fitted pencil skirt.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - They must be the easiest thing to pair with anything and look good. I was wondering if 3 were too many, but knowing you’ll be having 4 or 5, well now I’m thinking about 4 or 5. Ha. This underlining concept is a very good idea. The backside does get a little weak from sitting and walking. hmmm…great idea!
    ReplyCancel

  • Tasia - Great, inspiring collection! I also have a sad RTW pencil skirt that’s falling apart yet I continually wear. Time to whip up a new one! I’m just getting caught up on your blog but it looks like you’ve written up some awesome pencil skirt posts over the month, can’t wait to read them :)
    ReplyCancel

When Stars Don’t Align

Most of the time, when my sewing adventures don’t quite work out I don’t usually say anything. And I definitely don’t show you anything. Usually it doesn’t happen that often. I do try to keep a chin up and move on, not get too depressed about ruining an acre of fabric, but this past weekend was different. I was up for making my second, dark colored half slip out of this gorgeous navy blue silk charmeuse I found. And then I thought, “Let’s move onto the full version instead.” I had tested the pattern, because this is silk you know, not cheap and definitely not worth ruining. Surprisingly for a slip, there were quite a few alterations that needed to be made to the pattern. I felt rather impressed with myself that I took such care in testing the pattern actually.

Then, it was time to move onto cutting the blue silk. I made the mistake of cutting out the bra portion first and then turned my attention to the skirt only to find that there wasn’t enough fabric. I had bought the last of the bolt and was rather unhappy with only the yard and a half I got, but I was quite sure I could make the most of it. I determinedly cut out the back portion of the skirt and found that there was absolutely no way to cut out the front. I had purchased this silk from Hancock’s and since we have two locations here, I thought I could get lucky and find some more silk at the other location. Of course, they didn’t have any. Of course.

the very sad pieces of navy silk

So I came home, empty handed, and decided that the half slip version was going to have to work. I proceeded to cut out the back of the slip from the back I had cut for the full slip and again found that there was not enough fabric for the front half, even though this was the half slip. I tried cutting it out anyway, a little off grain, thinking this wouldn’t matter much. Ha ha ha. After cutting out the front and finding that it hung completely wrong, I’m here to tell you, I’ve completely destroyed an entire yard and a half of beautiful silk charmeuse. The loveliest part is that I’ve cut it up into little pieces that couldn’t possibly make their way into anything else garment wise.

It’s a pretty sad story, I must admit. There were no tears, which is surprising, but even worse, there is disappointment. Silly, silly girl. Tricks are definitely for people like Houdini. (I know you thought I was going to say “kids” huh. But I’m not a rabbit so what’s the fun in that?) Possibly even worse than all this, is that I actually “fff-ed up” on something so silly, a slip. A SLIPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!

Believe me when I tell you, all of us have our moments of utter shame and complete ineptitude on a very easy project. So, if you are having one of those moments, I’m here to say, you ain’t alone Sister! I recommend that you bookmark this post for future reference when those moments come along. Just remember, I messed up on a SLIP!

This heart wrenching story has been brought to you by:

  • $16 a yard navy blue silk charmeuse, which had the most beautiful purple tint to it
  • a very easy vintage slip pattern
  • Gingher shears, the likes of which you’ve never seen cut into silk
  • last, but not least, a silly disappointed red-headed girl
  • Cherri Porter - I understand. My life is filled with shame.
    I have a weird solution for you..
    Cut them into small shapes and sell them in your etsy store as silk quilt “squares.” Seriously. People use silk in fancy quilting projects all the time and like various kinds of shapes for that. You can get return on your money for it and buy new fabric for a new slip.
    ReplyCancel

  • Belly - Och, the frustration! at least you have your sense of humor… i think I’m going to print this post and hang it on my bulletin board. I can cry days about suchh a mishap 9okay, but i’m a cryer all right.)
    ReplyCancel

  • karen - Oh, the growing sense of doom as a project inches towards failure. I feel your pain! At least you have managed to keep your sense of humour and been brave enough to share.
    ReplyCancel

  • RepurposedGirl - Oh, Sunni, I feel your pain! We’ve all done this… we may not have slipped on a banana skin or wandered out of the ladies with loo roll trailing out of our waistbands, but we’ve all ruined a beautiful piece of fabric (or several) before… think of it as a brief fling with a lovely but otherwise emotionally unavailable piece of fabric, that was never meant to be a long-term thing, but a short and sweet encounter… and thanks for sharing!
    rgx
    ReplyCancel

  • peter - Sad — but funny — story. At least the experience gave you some great blog material! LOL Surely you can make little flowers out of it or something. Don’t throw that silk out just yet!
    ReplyCancel

  • ana - Poor you! I would be furious with myself if I did that. How about making silk roses from it?
    ReplyCancel

  • Tasia - Oh nooo! We’ve all had our share of bombed projects. Just put it away (or cut it up into flowers or remnants) and move on. Maybe pull out one of your most successful projects to look at and remind yourself that you’re awesome at sewing, 99.9% of the time :)
    ReplyCancel

  • A Sewn Wardrobe - Oh, I am so sorry about the loss of that beatiful blue fabric. And for your hurt pride! Isn’t a bad sewing project just *the worst*? I recently mentioned that to my husband, and he said that a crappy golf game is likely equally frustrating. I try to tell myself that sewing is a skill/hobby, and that one is going to have off days.
    You know, I appreciate hearing about sewing disasters. (Being a new sewer, I’ve had plenty!) I really think sewers learn from other sewers’ mistakes. I wouldn’t be ashamed to post about them. I think it keep a blog interesting and real, too.
    ReplyCancel

  • Angela - Oh no! So sorry to hear! I wonder if you could make a chemise out of the leftover pieces… is that possible?
    ReplyCancel

  • CGCouture - Definitely try to figure out something to repurpose the scraps into–maybe something for a future baby cupcake goddess? I’m sorry that you couldn’t make the slip though, especially when you spent so much on the fabric! :-(
    ReplyCancel

  • oonaballoona - tap. pants.
    ReplyCancel

  • Abby - I have felt this way too. Every time I begin to actually cut a project out, I feel so nervous. Cutting seems to usually be the part that is hard to fix if things aren’t quite right. I hate feeling that nervousness. I’m sorry.
    ReplyCancel

  • kiraph - Oh no! That is so disappointing.
    I have done a similar thing except I had bought fabric which was just horrible to sew – my overlocker ate it and my sewing machine skipped that many stitches I had no seam and that was after trying about 5 different needles of varying sorts. I just gave up on it!
    ReplyCancel

  • Hanna - Ouch, that´s bad. I´ve had my share of ruining beautiful silks in the past, too, mostly by cutting them wrong on the bias. It´s particularly bad when it´s vintage fabric (yes, I´ve ruined vintage silk crepes and satins), because, well, then I´ve destroyed something really unique.
    Hanna
    ReplyCancel

  • gail - Do you have enough for just a camisole?
    Maybe some lovely silk pressed fabric flowers?
    I found this tutorial for silk roses.
    http://calamitykim.typepad.com/calamity_kim/2008/10/fabric-roses-revisited.html
    ReplyCancel

  • Alessa - Ah well. My biggest messes have usually involved the most expensive fabric… The silk is lovely, though. Maybe you can make a little evening bag from the scraps?
    ReplyCancel

  • Monica - Pants….lots of panties
    ReplyCancel

  • Jamie Christina - Dang! I got kinda teary eyed =) Crazy thing is I have that pattern! I haven’t dissected it yet, but now I know I may need to make some alterations.
    ReplyCancel

Stitching Spotlights 7.23.2010

This week has been a terribly good week for me. I’ve been able to get some sewing done and go thrifting, which by the way, I made a serious haul. Found a pair of pants, a sweet pink raincoat and a few more sweaters. I’m getting more and more excited for Self Stitched September and have so many ideas to put to use for that month. It’s most definitely going to be a September to remember!

Gertie’s half slip tutorial and Isaspacey’s version

Isaspacey informed me that Mz. Gertie has posted a most useful and perfect slip making tutorial. It’s just like the slip I made, except you make your own personal sewing pattern. Hands down, handmade slips are the way to go. From cut to finish (after having made the paper pattern) you are looking at about 2 hours, if not less time. Best investment I’ve ever made. And just for a few more ideas to throw at you, my pattern also had grainlines for slips cut on the bias. Don’t leave out that option if you are finding you would like to make one of your own.

Here’s a few places online that sell silks, if you are interested in trying your own slip version, but don’t have access to silk in town.

I even thought about that lovely Bemberg rayon lining fabric would work for these.

And did I mention that I’m in love with plush back elastic? If you are going to try making your own slip, definitely give the plush back elastic a try. It’s really soft against the skin and makes it so the slip doesn’t ride up, in fact it doesn’t ride anywhere, but stays right in place without digging into your tummy. It’s also known as plush finishing elastic. Definitely give it a Google search.

I realize I’ve gone a bit slip crazy. And it won’t be ending real soon either as I bought more fabric and trim for a dark colored version. Oh yes, and speaking of trims, definitely look here for lace for that bottom edge. Soon, very soon, I’ll be onto the full-version slip. Just you wait.

Alright, enough about slips already. Have a lovely weekend, friends. Many sewing adventures await you, I’m sure.

  • Abby - How fun! I’m so excited to see your September things! It will be fun to see all the awesome things you have made! I even thought I could do a mini version of it, maybe just 2 or three outfits, but everybody starts somewhere, huh?
    ReplyCancel

  • Angela - Oo.. thanks for the lace link!
    ReplyCancel

  • Tasia - Ohmygod, Lace Heaven!! That’s awesome. Thanks for sharing!
    One day, I’ll sit down and pump out a ton of slips. You’re totally inspiring me!
    ReplyCancel

Pretty Little Underthings

When I’m out shopping or thrifting I always look for silk, real silk not polyester or nylon, underthings. They are seriously few and far between. I don’t mean a nightie or lingerie either (although, I suppose they fall into somewhat the same category), I mean underthings, you know like slips.  I’ve been in dire need of underthings, aka slips. I have had a skirt slip, manufactured from horrid nylon that has been my standby for much too long. It was high time for something new.

The two camisoles hiding behind the skirt slip were thrifted “nighties” that have since been cut short to be made into camisoles. The skirt slip is a recent stitched up fancy that I’ve long been meaning to do and never got around to. I don’t generally wear skirt slips, but I have two skirts that require them, even though the skirts themselves are lined. And judging from how much wear the nasty little nylon slip got, I apparently wear slips more than I even thought. All of these underthings are 100% silk making them more breathable than nylon or polyester. With the heat around here, it’s a definite must.

I made the skirt slip from this vintage pattern. Really a pattern is not necessary as I didn’t even follow the instructions for this one. In fact, I might just write up a tutorial, because I’ll be needing a black one too. I used a very light pink silk charmeuse, vintage lace for the trim and plush backed elastic for the waist. Ummm…have you tried plush backed elastic? If you haven’t, you really need to. Not only does it hold the thing in place and keep it from slipping all around town, but it feels fantastic compared with other elastic type waists I’ve tried. So fantastic, it’s like it’s not even there.

Do you ever wear slips? Do you have a hard time finding natural fiber slips? What are your secrets for underthings?

PS ~ after two days worth of wear, I’m in love with my silk slip! 100% no cling to skirts, complete breathability and not to mention the luscious feel of the silk against my skin is heavenly. Won’t ever be going back! Highly, highly recommend!

  • Jennifer - This is so funny! I have a blog I read called Conversations with a Conservative that blogged about slips just today. It must be the topic of the day! :)
    I love slips! I don’t wear them too often, but they are so pretty! I would loved a tutorial. I have one and it is nylon and ugly!
    ReplyCancel

  • Hanna - I wear them, too, but I prefer the slip-dress version as the skirt slips always tend to ride up. I have an absolutely beautiful, bias cut, ivory coloured vintage silk slip in pristine condition that I got for a steal on ebay and that turned out to be entirely handmade, even the scalloped hem. I´m amazed everytime I look at the tiny hand-stitching.But, even though it´s wonderful to wear it feels a little precious for everyday, so I feel I should make a new one soon. And yes, silk is just the best.
    Lovely blog, btw!
    Hanna
    ReplyCancel

  • lsaspacey - Your pink slip looks so much like one http://lifeisexamined.blogspot.com/2009/08/feel-pretty.html I made from Gertie’s tutorial! Does your tutorial differ that much from her’s? I’ll have to check out that plush-backed elastic because I now have four skirt slips in various lengths and colors and one full slip, but I want more!
    ReplyCancel

  • Kati - I don’t usually wear them because I can never find them! I look every single time I’m in a department store, they have nighties, but never any real slips. I think slips have been replaced by Spanx and other “shapewear”.
    I think I’ll end up with a vintage lingerie pattern similar to yours so that I can make slips.
    ReplyCancel

  • Abby - Yay! I’m so excited you are using that pattern!
    ReplyCancel

  • Jessica - I need to make a slip, so that I don’t have to line everything I make. I’m so lazy when it comes to making practical items – I’d rather buy them, but in the case of slips, as you say, there aren’t many choices, and most are made of awful fabrics. Your slip is lovely!
    ReplyCancel

  • Angela - How pretty! I don’t wear slips, but I would love to wear this one! :) I love the lace on the bottom.
    ReplyCancel

  • Shelby - I agree that slips are hard to find these days, I think that spandex has taken over, but think that slips are something that is worth having for skirts and dresses.
    ReplyCancel

  • Tasia - I don’t own any slips, but I sure wish I did! My problem is that they’re ‘utility’ pieces and therefore always on the backburner of my sewing agenda. Yours is super pretty and I’m freshly inspired to make a slip for myself – eventually!
    ReplyCancel

  • Tamsin - Slips always remind me of childhood and always having too many layers on when it was hot! Now I hate it when unlined skirts ride up when I’m wearing tights! I think a slip could come into play…
    ReplyCancel

  • Ana - I love that pattern. My mother used to make slips from it in the 70s. unfortunately I’m not the right size for it so all I can do is gaze wistfully at it these days. Glad I’m not the only one who has it!
    ReplyCancel

  • Suzie - I have never worn a slip before…but the more I think about it the more I’m surprised I have never realised how much I need one! I have a couple of unlined cotton skirts which ride-up and drive me insane…and slips are the answer! Doh! Thanks for giving me the inspiration!
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - I’m definitely going to do a dress version soon. I do think they are simply lovely and you can wear them with a skirt and a sweater on top. Fabulous idea.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - This is fabulous! I did not realize Gertie had posted about slips. Her tutorial is just the way I made mine! Definitely have a go at the plush back elastic. I love it!
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - I know! They seem to have gone into the realm of non-existence. It’s so sad too as I think many women would prefer to have a nice slip these days.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - I completely understand. I actually didn’t really want to “waste” my time making one either. I decided that I was finally going to make one for Self Stitched September and was pleasantly surprised at how very little time they took. Start to finish, probably about 2 hours. Easy, easy, easy!
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - I love it too! I found it while thrifting one day. It was such a find as it’s in my bust size, even though it’s in a junior’s size. I’m off to try the full-version next!
    ReplyCancel

  • Beth - I wear slips often. I only have a few as they are so hard to find in the stores! Yours is beautiful! I’m inspired to make some of my own.
    ReplyCancel

  • Catholic Bibliophagist - I always wear slips, but I hate nylon especially in summer when it’s very hot here in Southern California. I never thought of the possibility of making my own slip from silk. Thanks for a great idea.
    –C.B.
    ReplyCancel

Peachy Pout Sweater

In preparation for Self Stitched September, it was definitely time to start pulling out unfinished projects from the stash. Surprisingly, I haven’t had this sweater in the stash for very long. I really, really should have taken a before photo, but of course was much too lazy to do that at the time. So, this sweater came from some Nordstrom inspiration. Nordstrom’s is probably the nicest and most up-town department store we have here in Utah. And somehow, Mr. S gets their catalog.

This catalog arrived in the mail the other announcing a HUGE sale. I saw this rather dashing working girl outfit and convinced myself that I had to have that grey sweater, because I don’t knit and well, I couldn’t just make that as I could the rest of the outfit. Friday was the beginning of this supposed sale and so after a short day at work, I ran right over to see if I could get my hands on that sweater. Much to my dismay, I found the table of sweaters, no greys were left and then when I picked one up of a different color and handled it in my hands I almost starting laughing uncontrollably. Luckily, I stopped myself before I started. The sweater felt as thin as paper and I immediately knew that after two or three washes this thing would be toast! I had seen enough, right then and there, I gathered up what was left of my pride and stomped out of Nordstrom’s with a very serious chip on one shoulder. I have one phrase for you, “cheap in the disguise of expensive.”

I marched straight home, where I promptly got to work on my cashmere version of this sweater. This sweater was thrifted for $4. I’ll have you know, that I didn’t spend a dime more either, I used what I had in my stash, which makes me feel like a million dollars, maybe even 2 million. It had a small blue dot on the sleeve which has since been cut off. There were, much to my delight, no moth eaten holes in it. I found it in the ladies section, though have since discovered that is was a men’s sweater because it buttons up the wrong way. No matter. It was rather large, so I gave it some shape by taking in the sides. I followed this tutorial of Casey’s for saving the cuffs and bottom edging. I gave it some fresh buttons and with the scraps left over from taking in the sides and shortening the sleeves, I made one of the flowers. The other flower is made from some charmeuse silk that has been cut on the bias and gathered into a roll to look like a carnation.

I’m rather happy with the sweater in general. The color isn’t my favorite, and it isn’t grey, though I will be on the lookout for a grey sweater very soon. However, it shaped up rather nicely. I am completely in love with the medium weight cashmere. Who knew? Cashmere at a thrift store. I’ve never had a cashmere sweater and have always wanted one. It’s luscious and so so so soft. So there you have it! Something for $4 with much better quality than something for $45, thank you very much!

Thrifting much lately? Found any real gems? I want to hear all about them.

  • peter - I cannot believe that is a thrifted sweater! Brilliant job (again), Sunni!
    ReplyCancel

  • Belly - It’s lovely, and doesn’t look at all thrifted or homemade (and I do have the slightest weakness for peach colors: http://ow.ly/2dmYz).
    ReplyCancel

  • Jennifer - Very pretty! I think that will look gorgeous with your hair color!
    ReplyCancel

  • A Sewn Wardrobe - You might not have many high-end stores in Utah, but it sounds as though you have wonderful second-hand shops, which IMO is even better. There are no decent vintage stores around me, which stinks, b/c this great find of yours is making me want to go thrifting in the worst way!
    P.S. – While it’s pastel, I think you could make this fall- appropriate with a maroon/wine colored skirt (and a white button up underneath?).
    ReplyCancel

  • Tasia - Wow, what a lovely re-fashion! I’m also amazed at the prices charged for store-bought, paper-thin cardigans. Yours is gorgeous and how amazing that it’s made of cashmere too! Love the floral embellishments and I bet the colour will be great on you :)
    Wonderful job!
    ReplyCancel

  • Petite Josette - Very nice job !
    I love to see thrift store pieces transformed into new garments on the cheap !
    I have a few projects from thrifted item in my stash, 2 man’s shirts that I want to turn into women’s tops and a more ambitious trench coat project for which I am considering doing some dying…
    ReplyCancel

  • Angela - AHHHH!!! I LOVE IT!! That’s just way too cute! Hehe.. I need to do some thrifting!
    ReplyCancel

  • Max California - this is so damn pretty! great job!
    were the little welt pockets already on it?
    ReplyCancel

  • kiraph - This is just a lovely re-fashioning job, Sunni. And all the sweeter for being better quality fabric and only $4.00! Well done, it looks great and if it was me I would be living in it!
    The only recent thrifting finds I have had are some fabrics – one of which I have made into a shirt just in the past week.
    ReplyCancel

  • Rachel - So pretty! I have a day off tomorrow to go ‘op shopping’ as we call thrifting here, and have just added cashmere cardigans to my list! Thanks for the lovely inspiration!
    ReplyCancel

  • Abby - Oh La la la la la la la la la!!!! I love this! I just went to the DI today, and found this retro all different colored striped dress! Haha! My husband is scared that he is going to be letting me out of the house wearing it, but I LOVE it!
    ReplyCancel

  • Marie-Christine - Great job! And thanks for the tutorial link.
    As to the color, cashmere is perfect for the easy-to-use acid dyes. Or you could take off some of that aggressive pastel tone with a bit of tea-dyeing, also a bit acidic and perfect for animal fibers. Just make sure to thoroughly soak your sweater overnight before you begin, to make sure you get even dyeing.
    ReplyCancel

  • Carolina - It’s lovely! I would like to made the flowers, where I could find the tutorial? Thank you!!
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - I actually just improvised and made up my own patterns and such. The rounded petal flower is a round petal with a “V” cut in the bottom middle. The “V” is then sewn together and that creates the little pouf in the petal. The other flower is a strip of bias cut fabric. I sewed a gathering stitch directly down the middle and then gather it into a roll. Really easy.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - I’m growing much more keen on the color lately. It does make a great neutral and goes with so many things.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - Fabulous idea and I’ve been experimenting with navy too. It looks rather dashing with all these colors.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh yes! I would love to see a dying project! Fabulous idea. Can’t wait for your remakes.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh yes. I forgot to post about those. This sweater was actually quite a bit longer and had actual pockets. I was going to get rid of the pockets all together, but found that they were actually knitted onto the sweater. So, I just kept them. Gladly they look like welt pockets instead of something strange.
    ReplyCancel

  • The Cupcake Goddess - Oh thank you for the tips. I’m in love with the idea of the tea dye, giving it that sort of vintage edge stained look. Hmmmm…..
    ReplyCancel