February 28, 2017

Made: Burdastyle 2/2016 Men's Jacket

I've not made Mister AFS a jacket before, but I've threatened to several times. It was time to make good on that threat since I received some fabric in the mail that he took one look at and fell in love with. He's usually not the type to fall for fabric - I am - but he kept coming back to this one and stroking it and saying that he liked this or that about it and wondering what I was going to make out of it and on and on. Finally I caved and told him I would make him a jacket.
This fabric is from Organic Cotton Plus and one of the gals there contacted me in January and asked if I would review some fabric and in return I could pick what I wanted and have it shipped to me. I've actually worked with Organic Cotton Plus before and interestingly enough, made a jacket that time too. I decided to collaborate again because my previous experience was so positive. This was a very nice fabric to work with and a little unique in composition. It's made up of hemp/cotton/wool. The hemp in particular is a bit like linen. This was wonderfully lightweight and when it came, I was happy with the hand and weight and felt that it would do quite well as a spring/summer jacket. Organic Cotton Plus has started to branch out into some prints and also some interesting fiber compositions in the last while or so and that is always exciting to see!

OK, so this jacket. It is one of the few BurdaStyle men's patterns. This jacket has 4 or 5 variations and while it doesn't give you all the instructions for the different patterns in one, if you know what you're doing it's easy enough to figure out after a bit. I mean BurdaStyle instructions are laughable anyway, so really, the pattern (and rather impeccable drafting) is the game changer here. I wish they would do women's patterns like this. I would love 4 variations in one that are truly different from each other and not just, add a pocket here or switch out the collar there. The jacket pattern to end all jacket patterns, eh?
This pattern runs small. Pretty much really small. Mr. AFS measured the smallest size - he's a small guy by all accounts - and after muslin #1 I thought we should go up a size. So I went up a size and found that the bigger size was still on the small side. I would recommend going up 2 full sizes, but retaining the collar of the original size that your man measured. Going up one size was great for the shoulders and chest, bad for the collar. The hips were still too small so I had to slash and add some width there. As per normal for every single jacket pattern I seem to sew these days, the armholes and sleeve were restrictive so I tightened up the armhole (raised them an inch) and added a bit of width to the sleeve head (and length as the sleeve had drag lines in general). Next time, I'll still have to do something about the sleeves though as they are still pretty restrictive. They work for now and he can wear the jacket, but more tweaking for next time. I also added length overall to the sleeve and for once in my mister's life, he has a jacket that has long enough sleeves yet is still trim enough in the body for that slender stick figure he has going on.
I opted to go with a fusible tailoring method. My past self had purchased all of the Alison Smith Craftsy classes on Tailoring and I thought it might be fun to try some new things. I started watching the Structure and Shape class and first of all was mesmerized that Alison was from a place called Ashby-De-La-Zouch and that she had such a superb british accent. I felt that her interfacing methods were worth a try. She has several jackets that are either worn or on display or that she works on that look fantastic. I'd like to try all of the interfacing methods - she goes through 3 - but for this jacket, I narrowed in on the fusible method. My fabric was a bit shifty, loosely woven and thin and I felt it would benefit from the fusibles/glues. It did and I'm happy with the outcome. Alison warned that this sort of tailoring treatment would result in a soft type of jacket, and I am happy to report that it did (which is what I was aiming for as per Mr. AFS input). The mister wanted something lightweight and comfortable and this did the trick. Really a perfect combination for a lighter weight, more casual jacket. I especially liked Alison's treatment of the shoulder and the tapes around the edges of certain pieces. This particular Craftsy class is definitely worth the splurge, if only for the fusible tailoring treatments. What I've found - because I actually have several online tailoring classes and several books on the subject - is that there is no one way to tailor a jacket. There seem to be general guidelines, but then it comes down to the wearer too and what they want. A subject for another time I think, but I'm interested in doing more jackets this year. Goodness knows I have the fabric for it!
I bagged the lining and used the method outlined in Easy Guide to Sewing Linings and also Sew Stylish Magazine Fall 2010 (Bagging a Lining). This jacket has a classic vent in the back that I wanted to retain and there are instructions in Easy Guide to Sewing Linings on how to do this and then the rest of the lining was done with the Sew Stylish article. I attached the collar using an industry method from Threads Magazine no. 68 (The Foolproof Notched Collar) which I really liked, but I'm interested in trying some different methods too. By the way, I love Threads magazine with passion and have all the back issues! I am a nut for anything sewing.

For the most part, I'm happy with how this jacket turned out. I haven't sewn a jacket in quite some time and so this was a good refresher. Mr. AFS was very excited about this jacket and I feel that the thinner lapels and overall slim look of the pattern accentuates his tall, thin self. The fabric was great to work with - yes, this is my plug for Organic Cotton Plus! This is going to work wonderfully as a lightweight Spring/Summer jacket and will last the mister a long time too. Whew! If you have now made it to the end here, can we all comment on how posh Mr. AFS looks? <whistle> Mr. Dapper over here! Now. Back to sewing some items for myself....
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18 comments

  1. Mr. AFS certainly looks good in his new jacket. What did you use for lining?

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    1. I used a bemberg rayon lining. I have oodles of it and it works great for jackets. I do with it came in prints, but since it comes in a wide range of colors, I'm happy with that too.

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  2. What a fabulous jacket. I can see why he really liked this fabric - very nice!

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  3. It's marvelous. He looks super dapper.

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  4. I love the look of that fabric, and it was perfect for the jacket - most excellent!

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  5. Great job, Sunni! And yes he does look dapper :). I too have that Craftsy class and love listening to Alison teach. Gotta love the Brittish accent. On another note, I have been looking for nice wool crepe. Can't find any since you closed your store. You had such a nice collection and I kick myself now for not buying more when I had the chance :(. I would love to get my hands on some of the mustard yellow wool crepe you used to make the Sewaholic skirt. Do you have a source still for wool crepe? I have also been considering branching out and sewing for our little clothing boutique we own but need sources for wholesale fabric options. Do you mind sharing your leads for that as well? You can email me direct if you would rather.

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    1. I should have added my name!

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    2. Hi Tina,

      Gosh, I just don't know where you could find wool crepe in a lot of different colors these days. Emma One Sock has some nice colors, but I'm not sure they carry the mustard color. The wool crepes that I carried in my store were from Stylecrest Fabrics - a wholesaler. They had lots of lovely colors. I worked with Alan Farbstein who is one of THE most pleasant people ever! You can find his contact info here:

      https://www.linkedin.com/in/alan-farbstein-324ba114

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    3. Thanks, Sunni for the information!

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  6. This looks so good. It's beautifully structured and I especially like the narrow lapels and elbow patches. Part of me would love the opportunity to make something like this, and the other part is terrified!

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    1. I know what you mean by terrifying, but if you take it a day/section at a time, it's definitely a doable project. Just takes time.

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  7. Just beautiful. Look at the set of those sleeves! A work of art.

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  8. fantastic, great fit and the style/fabric looks like something you would buy in a high end Italian boutique.

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  9. You did such a wonderful job! The jacket is amazing!

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  10. The jacket looks amazing! Well done, as always.

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  11. Love that fabric. Would you mind sharing a link to it?

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  12. nice jacket looking amazing loved it
    http://www.angelmstyle.com/

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