April 3, 2015

Fabric Friday: Chantilly Lace

In keeping with last week's Fabric Friday, I thought I would keep going with the lace family. When you start delving into lace, it becomes more mysterious and fascinating all at the same time - or at least I think so. I find it amazing that what looks like such a delicate fabric can really be so strong. Really cool.

Today I thought I would focus on Chantilly Lace. Did you know that in french, the word Chantilly means something along the lines of whipped cream? It's also the name of a city in France where Chantilly Lace originated from (hence the name for Chantilly Lace, even though knowing about the whipped cream part is pretty fun too). A fine chantilly lace is truly lovely. Personally, I rarely see one that has a design that I truly love, so when I do, I snatch it up!

Chantilly lace is different from re-embroidered lace in a few key ways. Instead of the motifs being embroidered onto English Net and then possibly beaded, Chantilly has the motif woven into the lace itself. Re-embroidered lace has a surface design that is applied after and the Chantilly has more of a flat, less textural design that is woven directly into the lace as it's being made.


Chantilly started out as a bobbin lace. What's bobbin lace? It's also known as pillow lace because it was worked by hand on a pillow. Individual strands/fibers were designed (braided and twisted) around a set of pins that were placed in the pillow at various intervals. From there the individual strands were worked into a lace and while they were worked they were wound around various bobbins to keep them separate.



Fine Chantilly has a picot edge - or eyelash edge as I've heard it called too. These looped edges run along the scallops which would be considered the selvedge on regular fabrics. Again, as I stated last week, lace doesn't have a grainline, so you can utilize the scallops to your advantage. Along a pretty neckline or at the edge of a sleeve or hemline of a skirt or dress.

Have you ever used Chantilly? Have one in your stash? Do tell!

Find more Fabric Friday posts here!

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10 comments

  1. Hi Sunni, I just wanted to say how much I enjoy these fabric Friday posts. I've learned so much! This lace is gorgeous. I hope you do a silk series at some point! Thank you for sharing your knowledge!

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  2. "Did you know that in french, the word Chantilly means cream?"

    Chantilly doesn't mean cream in French. It's a type of sweetened whipped cream used in desserts: crème chantilly. As far as I know, the name of the lace comes from the town where it originally was produced.

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  3. Oh thank you! I actually have a french friend who told me it meant cream or whipped cream, I couldn't quite remember. Updated now!

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  4. Just like last week's post on re-embroidered lace, I love this one! I didn't know Chantilly lace started as bobbin lace. When I first red about it, it was hard to imagine what it was, and I found the below YouTube video that gives a great visual. Thought I'd share!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWQ-KZoePIo

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  5. Add me to the list who LOVES these Friday fabric postings. Thanks for taking the time to do them. I appreciate it.

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  6. as with the other comments above, i really appreciate your fabric postings. i am also hoping some one posts a lace make, as i was given some leftover lace from a friends wedding dress years ago and would like to make something but am drawing a blank!!! and your posts on lace are definitely inspiring me to think a bit harder.

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  7. Love Love your Chantilly Lace...glad you finally found yours. I'm still on the search, because like you haven't seen one I can
    live without.

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  8. I'm surprised to say that I do have a piece of fine Chantilly lace in my stash with an eyelash edge! Who knew! Now I do, because you educated me. Thanks for deepening my appreciation of a gorgeous piece.

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  9. […] like cheating really to be talking about Alençon Lace today. Why? Because it’s basically Chantilly Lace that is corded (and we talked about Chantilly last week, in case you missed). How do you pronounce […]

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  10. Very useful, thanks for the post!

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