December 11, 2014

Fabric Friday: Wool Gabardine

As we continue on with highlighting woolens, I thought it would be great fun to feature a fabric every Friday. There are many varieties of wool out there and if I do say so myself, it's awesome to know what you're buying or what you have already. Today, I'm giving it up to wool gabardine.

Let's break this all down now. Wool is the fiber type - I'll be going over different kinds of wool fiber next week, so then you'll be a wool ninja! - and gabardine is the weave structure. Do y'all know what weave structure is? I don't know if you've ever actually seen a weaving loom, but I've seen several. Strange, strange coincidence is that here in Utah, there are a lot of ladies who weave their own cloth. It's fascinating really. I can't tell you all the gory details about weaving (because I don't know any!), but I do know that there are basic weave structures and one of them is twill. Gabardine is a twill. This basically means that when you look at it closely, the yarns look diagonal - like denim! Yes, denim, that fabric your jeans are made of is a twill weave.

The thing that is different about wool gabardine is that it's always drapey. I have to be honest and say I'm not exactly sure what gives gabardine its drape, but it's got nice flow. Wool Gabardine is a medium weight fabric and works nicely for jackets, pants, dresses and skirts. Think suiting.

Remember these pants? Those are a luscious bright red wool gab. You'll find that with wool fabrics, you can do a lot of different things design/sewing wise. For example, the same wool fabric that can be used to make a flowy dress, can also be used to make a tailored jacket. This is the lovely thing about wool - its versatility.

Have you worked with wool gab before? Do you have wool gab in your stash?

For more about Wools, visit the Working with Wool Section!

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