Self Finished Seams Pt. II

Here’s a few more self finished seams that are more or less versions of each other. I’ll think you’ll find these useful and totally easy to do. Tomorrow I’ve got some really fun decorative seams coming up that you can do in conjunction with the seam finishes I’ve shown. Isn’t it amazing how many seam finishes there are? Hopefully these small tutorials have expanded your palette on what seam finishing you can use next!

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French Whipped Seam

This is a great seam finish for lightweight to medium weight fabrics where a curved seam is called for – like in the armhole.

Stitch a plain seam, then stitch again 1/8″ away from the original seam.

This next part you can do one of two ways. The first option – I like better for medium weight fabrics – is to trim the seam to 1/8″ from the 2nd stitching line and then overcast the seam with a zigzag edge. The second option – which I like better for lightweight fabrics – is to do this last step in reverse. Stitch the zigzag edge and then trim close to the zigzag stitching. I don’t know about you, but with lightweight fabrics, the fabric ends up getting caught in the machine feed and basically ruining it if done with the first option.

Use for: lightweight to medium weight fabrics
Application: apply this seam finish after you’ve stitched a seam; works especially well on curved seam areas

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Hairline Seam

A really great option for sheer fabrics where there is likely not going to be any strain.

Instead of stitching the seam with a straight stitch, stitch a narrow zigzag stitch. Then trim close to the edge.

Use for: lightweight & sheer fabrics
Application: apply this seam finish instead of a straight stitch; great for areas with little or no strain.

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Double Stitched Seam

This seam finish is good for knits that have a tendency to curl at the edges – though it works great for wovens too.

Stitch a regular seam and then stitch again 1/8″ away from the seamline with a narrow zigzag or straight stitch. Trim close to stitching.

Use for: lightweight to medium weight wovens and knits
Application: apply this seam finish after you’ve stitched a seam

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Self Bound Seam

Another nice seam finish that’s sort of a variation on the french seam.

Stitch a regular seam and then trim one side of the seam allowance to 1/8″ or 1/4″ depending on the fabric weight and tendency to fray.

Fold the edge of the other seam allowance over 1/8″ and turn over to encase the shortened seam allowance.

Slip stitch or machine stitch in place.

Use for: lightweight to medium weight fabrics
Application: apply this seam finish after you’ve stitched a seam

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Overedge-Stitch or Overlock Stitch Seam

You might be surprised that your machine may come equipped with a seam finishing stitch of its own. Mine looks like the photo above (its button no. 8). What’s more, there are even special feed I can purchase that actually will overedge seam finish and cut the fabric at the same time, very much like a serger! Definitely check it out!

Use for: lightweight to heavyweight fabrics
Application: apply instead of the seam stitch or 1/8″ away from the seamline

Happy seam finishing!

xoxo,

Sunni

 

  • liza jane - I always wondered how to finish curved seams like armhole seams (no serger here). Also intrigued by the self bound seam. Love this series- great information!ReplyCancel

  • Kris - Loving seam finishing week, the pictures are extremely helpful! Thank you so much!ReplyCancel

  • LM - LOVE, TOTALLY LOVE these posts! they are very helpful! Thank you so much for putting them together.
    And thank you for offering to show us where, on a garment, it is appropriate to use each of them. It saves us, the beginners, from so much frustration :) I think i will wait until all of these posts are in before i touch (and destroy) anything elseReplyCancel

  • Iva - I am absolutely loving this series! Seam finishing has always been the bane of my sewing! These posts are getting bookmarked! Thank you!ReplyCancel

  • Habace - I have an overlock on my machine. But it only works well if the needle goes beyond the edge of the fabric on the right-hand side as I stitch. That is, it then actually “locks” the edge of the fabric so it doesn’t fray. I f indvthe same with the zigzag as seam finish. If the fabric is too fine for a zigzag or overlock, I use a clean finish (turn under a quarter inch and stitch).ReplyCancel

  • Ginger - These tutorials are so helpful! Thanks a million!!ReplyCancel

  • julia alexander - Hi I am currently making hip hop dance trousers with a drop crotch, they have no front or back
    seam, please can you tell me which seam would be the best to use around the crotch area which is curved in shape, it would need to be very strong as these trousers have to go through some pretty
    hard work.

    Many thanks
    JuliaReplyCancel