Beltmaking – Toolkit

Fellow Stitchers – meet the beltmaking hardware! Yay! I’m pretty excited to show you some really fun beltmaking tutorials. I’m really hoping that everyone gets a kick out of the belts that I’ve got planned and I seriously can’t wait to see your versions. Before any of the fun begins, you’ll need the right tools for the job. So let me tell you about what I’ve found that works quite well. I have done a whole lot of research to give you the best options out there while still keeping a few bucks in your pocket, plus I’ve found a few tricks for how to handle the hardware on belts, so here goes:

Toolkit

Toolkit

My biggest beef with beltmaking tools is that I wanted you guys to have easy access to getting them. Plus affordability with a professional result is really important to me. Not many of us are lucky enough to afford the rather expensive professional presses and that includes me! For the purposes of my tutorials you will need a hammer, pliers, an awl and sharp shears. I’ve also included a hole puncher in this kit which is a newer to me item but one that has made punching holes so much easier, but its totally optional because I’m also going to show you how to punch holes without this gadget. This little doo-dad punches perfect 3/16″ holes for eyelets though. It’s seriously a great investment and personally, if you plan to make your own belts a bunch, you’ll want one. I plan to carry these in the shop, but for now you can find them here (scroll down a little and you’ll find them under “individual arch punches”). You’ll need the 3/16″ size.

Eyelet Tool

Eyelet Tool

You will also need an eyelet tool to go in your toolkit – if you plan to use eyelets. This is the Dritz eyelet tool (for #104 eyelets) that you can find in any fabric chain store and its the best tool for getting a rolled eyelet, in my opinion. These sell for around $3 and are used in conjunction with a hammer. These are, in my opinion, by far better than using the plier kit which costs a lot more. Promise. These yield a much better result, with a little technique which I plan to show you. Let me warn you that these say they are for 5/32″ eyelets but if you will refer to yesterday’s post on how to measure eyelets, you’ll know that this is confusing. Please note that this eyelet tool for #104 eyelets, is really for 3/16″ (in diameter) eyelets. Clear as mud? Yeah, I know, I totally don’t get it either!

Snap Pliers

Snap Pliers

I’ll be using snaps on one of the belts so I felt I should throw this tool in the mix too. These also have the eyelet plier on them too. Ha. These work fairly well for snaps with a little maneuvering.

Alright, I think that just about covers it. Hopefully I haven’t forgotten anything. Next week, we’ll start making belts! Yay! Have a very happy weekend!

xoxo,
Sunni

  • House of pinheiro - Looking forward to see this series…ReplyCancel