Whipping the Lining into Shape


Today’s post is very similiar to yesterday’s post. The lining is so easy peasy to put together. The darts and pleats are stitched, then the inseam, outseam and crotch seam. The pocket is gone! Yay! A lot less fuss and stitching. Let’s get to it then, shall we?

♥ Darts & Pleats ♥


Stitch darts on back trouser leg lining (piece 3). Press towards center back. Stitch pleats on front trouser leg lining (piece 1). Press pleats toward center front. Baste along top edge of trouser front to secure pleat to pant.

♥ Inseam, Outseam & Crotch Seam ♥


Pin right trouser leg front lining (1) to right trouser leg back lining (3), right sides together along the outseam (the seam that runs along the outside of the leg). Stitch. Press seam open. Do the same for the left leg, however leave the opening for the zipper unstitched. Pin right trouser leg front lining to right trouser leg back lining at inseam (the seam that runs along the inside of the leg). Stitch. Press seam open. Do the same for the left leg. To stitch crotch seam, turn one leg inside out and have one leg right side out. Put the right side out leg inside the inside out leg and pin crotch seam making sure fronts and backs are actually, front and back; that plaids and stripes are matched up correctly. Stitch crotch seam with 5/8″ seam allowance. In the curve of the crotch, stitch another reinforcing seam 1/4″ from original seam. Trim seam allowances, but do not clip curves. Press the crotch seam to one side.


Once the lining has been stitched, its time to insert the lining piece into the pants. With the lining inside out, place the lining inside your trouser shell with wrong sides together. Baste stitch along the top edge to secure in place. We’ll leave the hemming of the lining until the end.

If you are rather new to linings you might question a few things. Firstly, should the seams have seam finishes. I say yes. I serged the lining for the seam finish on this pair and on my black pair (which I’ll be showing you later) I did french seams. Lining fabrics have a definite tendency to fray and it will add to the longevity of your lining to finish the seams.

Secondly, you may be wondering what side of the lining goes against your skin and which side goes against the pants. I actually did wonder this back when and used to sew my linings with the seams facing towards my skin. This is not correct. One of the great points of a lining is that you don’t have any exposed seams. They should all be tucked away in the garment. This means that the seams should not be against your skin, but against the shell’s seams. Does that make sense? This also means that when you leave the opening for the zipper it will be on the opposing side that you stitched the opening for the pant shell. Pretty crazy huh? Hold up your pieces to you before you stitch seams. It will make more sense that way and won’t leave you in a lurch.

Tomorrow we have it out with the waistband. I have a few variations to show you too. I’ve found that bias waistbands are more complex that I thought. We’ll have fun with that tomorrow. Toodles! Happy weekending!

xoxo,

Sunni

  • Amanda - I just bought a serger and used it on my completed Pendrell blouse – I love it! Sooo satisfying.
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  • Liz - Can you do french seams even on the hip area? And did you only do french seams on the lining, and not the shell fabric?
    (Sorry for asking so many questions… these are my first pair of pants.)
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  • Musetica - Love, love your blog and I can’t wait to get to a point where I could attempt a pair of pants. Right now I am very far away from that, I am a beginner :) I have a question re. lining (I know this will sound really stupid to some of you…) which one is the side that should come against the skin? is it the one that is the shiniest or the other one? Also, what kind of silk fabric do you use for lining garments? (there’s so many of them…) Thank you so much and I can’t wait to see your pants finished, I love that fabric!
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  • Ban Clothing - This tutorial is really educational. You are very knowledgable in your technique. I like the step by step approach and although I am not sewing a pair of pants at this time it is definitely something I will be looking up in the future. Shorts for summer perhaps.
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Hi Musetica,
    No question is stupid. Promise. For silk charmeuse (the shiny on one side silk) the choice is completely up to you. I like the shiny side against my skin, but if you like the feel of the dull side against yours, by all means go for it. I don’t typically use silk charmeuse for a lining, unless it’s for something really luxurious. I typically use bemberg rayon lining (but sometimes china silk, which is dull on both sides). It’s a little more durable and a little more affordable than silk.
    xoxo,
    Sunni
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  • The Cupcake Goddess - Yes, you can. I would not recommend doing french seams in the crotch though. Just stitch a second row of stitching. And yes, I did french seams on the lining and not the shell fabric, though you can do them for both if you like. Totally up to you.
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