June 15, 2011

Self Finished Seams Pt. I



Today I'll be going over a few self finished seams and then tomorrow, I'll add a few more. For these seam finishes, just make sure that you watch the right and wrong sides of the fabric - I've tried to make that clear, but don't hesitate to ask questions. Gosh, you guys will be seam finishing fiends by the end of this. Also, how would you feel if I showed you some seam finishes in action next week? Like, garments that I've completed and the different seam finishes I've used in the different areas of the garments? Sometimes you have all the tools, but you don't know where to apply the tools - and usually there's not really a right or wrong answer when it comes to this type of thing. Let me know what you think and we'll continue seam finishing into next week. Sound good? Alright, let's get into self finished seams:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


French Seam


This is my favorite seam finish when I'm working with silk type fabrics - especially sheers. It looks positively lovely when done.



To do a french seam, you'll begin with your seam allowances wrong sides together, pin and stitch 1/4" seam allowance. Now, trim this seam allowance to 1/8" and press it to one side.



Turn over and press a crease along the newly stitched seam allowance with right sides together. Pin, and stitch 3/8" seam allowance. This will end up enclosing the raw edge of the first seam that was stitched.



Use for: sheer to medium weight fabrics
Application: apply this seam finish as you construct a garment



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Simulated French Seam


I'm a forgetful type, especially while sewing. So this is a great option if you've forgotten that you wanted to do a french seam somewhere and you didn't prep it right.



With right sides together, stitch 5/8" seam allowance. Instead of pressing the seam open, press each seam allowance side in towards the seam 1/4".



Pin and stitch 1/8" from the edge of the folded edges.



When finished, press the seam to one side. That's a pretty nifty trick right?


Use for: sheer to medium weight fabrics
Application: apply this seam finish after you've stitched a seam allowance


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Flat Felled or Felled Seam


You'll see this seam finish on jeans, but you can apply it anywhere you like really. What about applying this lovely to the Sewaholic's Crescent Skirt waistband? The cool thing about flat felled seams is that they are raised up from the surface and create not only visual, but a textural effect as well. This is a key thing to remember with felled seams because these are on the garment's outside. The above techniques are on the garment's inside. Cool huh?



With wrong sides together, stitch a 5/8" seam allowance (or larger, but that would entail prior thought to seam allowances before cutting your final fabric).



Press towards one side and trim the bottom seam allowance to 1/8". Press the top seam allowance in towards the center 1/4".




Pin and edgestitch 1/8" from the folded edge of the top seam allowance through all layers of fabric. For extra bulky fabrics, slip stitch the top seam allowance in place and then edgestitch if needed.


Use for: lightweight to heavyweight & bulky fabrics
Application: apply this seam finish after you've stitched a seam allowance


I'll be back tomorrow with more self finished seam goodness.


xoxo,


Sunni

SHARE:
© A Fashionable Stitch. All rights reserved.
MINIMAL BLOGGER TEMPLATES BY pipdig