June 16, 2010

My Adventure with Handmade Buttonholes



I've done handmade buttonholes before,  but not ever quite like I did on my Boysenberry Pastry Blouse. When I've done them before, its always been just one on a jacket or something, more as a decorative touch to finish the garment. Then I decided that I needed to at least given them a try on a blouse. These were rather involved and mostly because it took so long to find the ingredients I needed to do them.

I read here on them and decided, as I was not sewing a jacket, I would do the simulated buttonhole. Some turned out better than others, I grant you, but this is my first time doing all of the buttonholes on a shirt, by hand, so cut me a little slack please. I was rather thrilled at how they turned out, thank you very much.



The Details: The supplies for these babies were not readily accessible to me. I had to make do with what I could find quite frankly. They just don't make sewing supplies like they used, do they? I could not for the life of me find buttonhole gimp so I decided I would use Coats and Clark buttonhole thread for the gimp. Though I'm sure it is not the exact same thing, it has many of the same properties I read about that actual gimp would have. I found this at my local fabric store, though could not for the life of me find a link for it, but just know, it's there. I found the buttonhole twist here, and though I loved the colors these came in, I would be even happier if you could pick the weight of the thread. By weight, I mean the denier. The weight was fine for this project, however when I tried a buttonhole on a heavier weight fabric, denim to be exact, the thread was definitely not fat enough.



Something you absolutely cannot live without (in my humble opinion) if you decide to try your hand at these, is beeswax to coat your thread. It's magical how it detangles threads. Simply magical. In fact, I will never be without beeswax again. I also used fray stop on the edges of the buttohole slit. Quite frankly I don't love this product, but I didn't want to be messy with wax or the like.

These are a beautiful complement to a garment I think. I do love a bound buttonhole too, but was ready try something different this time around. What do you think? Have you ever tried these?
SHARE:

14 comments

  1. Those buttonholes are gorgeous!! I always forget these little handmade additions when I am at the final leg of a project. I hope I remember next time because they just look fantabulous!

    ReplyDelete
  2. They look amazing. I dread to think how long this took you. I really must get my hands on some beeswax, as I curse violently at knotting thread every time I hand sew.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Gorgeous! You are very talented! I wouldn't even know where to start to do this by hand! You should be very proud of yourself!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Gorgeous! Very nicely done! I learned how to do hand buttonholes back in school, but haven't done them since...I love how tidy and tight they look though!

    ReplyDelete
  5. those buttonholes are so neat! I loved the blouse and want your hair :-)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have often used either 3 strands of embroidery floss or some pearl cotton as the gimp thread in a machined buttonhole. Perhpas the same effect could be managed by hand.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wowza! Those are AMAZING! great job!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow! How long did each of these take to do?

    ReplyDelete
  9. So do I karen! I swear they have wizards who put magical "anti knotting" spells on the beeswax. It works like a wonder every time. You will not regret this purchase.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you! And they are more durable than machine made I've noticed. They are very "fat" too, which is kind of fun.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is a great idea and one I'm going to try. I haven't tried using gimp or gimp substitute in a machine made buttonhole, but I can definitely see how they would be more durable and stronger with the gimp.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks peter. The time went faster as I was watching old movies at the time I was stitching them. All in all it took about 3 hours to complete each of the 6 buttonholes. Not too bad, but still much longer than what I'm used to.

    ReplyDelete
  13. They're beautiful! Thanks for the tips and resource information!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Excuse me, i am very interested in the threads of the buttonhole. do you know where i can find ? by the way, i am in shanghai China. thank you

    ReplyDelete

© A Fashionable Stitch. All rights reserved.
MINIMAL BLOGGER TEMPLATES BY pipdig